Exposé Online banner

The Mothers Earth Experiment — The Mothers Earth Experiment
(Swordfish SWFCD35 / SWFLP35, 2017, CD / LP / DL)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-08-21

The Mothers Earth Experiment Cover art

The oddly named The Mothers Earth Experiment (TMEE) is a young six-piece UK band of friends: Jackson Younger (guitar), Mark Roberts (vocals and guitar), James Baker (keys and vocals), Oliver Overton (percussion), Jake Clarke (bass), and Reece Greenfield (drums and vocals). Their first release was the EP Don’t Speak Against the Sun in September 2015 when they opened for Gong. Since then they’ve opened for other acts across the UK such as Syd Arthur, Soft Machine, Acid Mothers Temple, Nicholas Allbrook (Tame Impala and Pond), Braids, and Arthur Brown. On May 19, 2017 the band released their self-titled six-track album, plus a limited edition single for this year’s Record Store Day. Their music is a blend of progressive rock and jazz with some bluesy elements. TMEE is basically an instrumental band with occasional vocals. And they straddle the line between melodic and academic. There is a resemblance to Mars Volta, a band that I never liked because of their artsy and sterile vocal lines. What TMEE has done is made this approach much more palatable. The best track on the album for me is “Elbow Room,” a very interesting piece with shifting tempos, gritty vocals, and a wonderful blend of progressive rock and jazz. Their Record Store Day single “Cool Down Mama” is the closing track on the album. This song is different from the rest of the music on the disc. In addition to Mark’s smooth vocals and the prog-jazz fusion, TMEE included some totally unexpected tribal chanting. Recommended for fans of contemporary progressive music.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): The Mothers Earth Experiment

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Schicke Führs Fröhling (SFF) - The Collected Works of Schicke Führs Fröhling – During their brief yet productive career from 1976 to 1978, the trio of Ede Schicke (drums), Gerd Führs (keys), and Heinz Fröhling (guitar, Mellotron) produced three outstanding albums on...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues