Exposé Online banner

The Telescopes — As Light Return
(Tapete TR351, 2017, CD / LP)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-08-25

As Light Return Cover art

Since 1987, Stephen Lawrie and a variety of different musicians have been performing live and recording under the name of The Telescopes. As Light Return is their ninth album, their second on Tapete Records. This changing band makeup has become part of Lawrie’s concept, varying from concert to concert and release to release. My only other exposure to The Telescopes is their 2012 7-inch Black Eyed Dog on defunct Irish indie label Trensmat Records. That EP featured a cover of Nick Drake’s song and is vastly different from the wall of noise and distortion on As Light Return. Belying the uplifting title of As Light Return, the five instrumental tracks are a dark and blistering sonic assault, just like Acid Mothers Temple at their most abstract. Lawrie has over-processed his electric guitar to produce screeching feedback and layers of distortion with interacting overtones that sound like a spongey wall of sound, which is also conveyed by the cover art. Sometimes there is a detectable rhythm and percussion track buried under the noisy sludge like on “You Can’t Reach What You Hunger” or “Something in My Brain.” On the other tracks it is as if time stands still and all you experience is an endless, merciless sonic attack. If you listen carefully, you may detect the sibilant sounds of subliminal vocals. Only on “Something in My Brain” can you actually distinguish a voice and some of the words, which I guess is the something in Lawrie’s brain. Overall the music reminds me of Canadian Aidan Baker’s project Nadja. And I guess As Light Return answers the question of what do you get when you over-process the guitar? A “Hand Full of Ashes” or a “Handful of Ashes,” tracks 3 and 5. While not an engaging disc, this music requires a discerning palate to fully appreciate.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): The Telescopes

Latest news

2020-01-21
Gong Announces UK Tour for 2020 – Having spent the last few years touring the world, including dates in Japan with psych legend Steve Hillage, multiple headline European tours and festivals, America’s Cruise to the Edge festival, a South America headline tour, and a headline performance at Tomorrow Festival in China, the band have won the hearts of both traditional and modern Gong fanbases. During this live journey, Gong has delved further into the truly psychedelic, exploratory, and mind-expanding side of the music. » Read more

2020-01-15
Carlos Alvarado RIP – Carlos Alvarado, pioneering composer, multi-instrumentalist and pioneer of progressive rock and electronic experimental music in Mexico, passed away January 14th, 2020 at age 68 after a two year battle with cancer.  » Read more

2020-01-12
Wolfgang Dauner RIP – Pianist Wolfgang Dauner, one of the pioneers of both European free jazz and jazz rock, has died at the age of 84. With his own groups and with the United Jazz+Rock Ensemble, his playing and compositions were a prominent presence in European jazz from the mid-60s until just recently. » Read more

2020-01-12
Michael Allison RIP – Michael Allison, who since 1997 has been recording as Darshan Ambient, passed away on January 9th after a long and brave battle with cancer. He has been at at the forefront of the new ambient/electronic music scene, with over eighteen releases to his credit. » Read more

2020-01-10
Neil Peart RIP – One of rock music's defining drummers has died at the age of 67. Neil Peart's work with Rush provided one of the templates for percussion in rock, and he certainly ranks in the top ten most influential drummers of the 20th Century. Peart retired from playing in 2015 due to health issues, and succumbed to brain cancer on January 7, 2020. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Cobra High - Sunset in the Eye of the Hurricane – I have learned to be wary when the mainstream press describes an artist as “progressive” – you never know what they really mean, since the vast majority of progressive music is...  (2003) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues