Exposé Online banner

Permanent Clear Light — Maurice n'est pas la
(Fruits de Mer winkle 31, 2018, 7")

by Henry Schneider, Published 2018-07-15

Maurice n'est pas la Cover art

Psychedelic Finns Permanent Clear Light are back on Fruits de Mer with a three track 7-inch slab of vinyl Maurice n’est pas la. FdM normally releases singles with at least one cover tune, but this time the three songs are all original, taken from the recording sessions for their next LP. So to offset the lack of a cover tune, FdM elected to release this single with two different cover designs, a sexy design with the back sides of three 40s era women ala The Andrews Sisters and the other a fantasy cover with lily pads, a worried tiny girl, and hungry carp. The A Side contains “One in Five,” a song about recent research indicating that 20% of adult Finns have at some point in their lives suffered from mental disorders. The song opens with Mellotron boy choir tapes that lend a surreal and eerie intro to this trippy psych-pop song. And in some sense, it reminds me of The Luck of Eden Hall. The other track is “This Quiet Smiling Man,” a song about, of all things, Robert Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project. There are phased and distorted guitars and reversed tapes, with the end of the song sounding a bit like The Doors’ “Unhappy Girl.” The B side is the 8 minute title track. This song has bubbly analog sequencers, swooping synths, and a bit of Krautrock that weave intricate patterns to form their interpretation of astro funk. This new release is probably their most psychedelic to date. And if you act quickly, you may still be able to snag a copy for yourself.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Permanent Clear Light

More info
http://www.fruitsdemerrecords.com/maurice.html

Latest news

2020-03-24
Bill Rieflin RIP – The sad news reaches us today of Bill Rieflin's death. Rieflin was best known as a drummer in bands ranging from post-punk to industrial to indie-rock to progressive rock, including work with The Blackouts, Ministry, Nine Inch Nails, Swans, Land, and King Crimson. Rieflin had been battling cancer for several years, and succumbed to it on March 24. He was 59. » Read more

2020-03-17
Cruise to the Edge and Seaprog 2020 Festivals Postponed – The worldwide outbreak of the novel coronavirus has started to produce casualties in the music festival world, and music festivals are not immune. We've had word that both the Cruise to the Edge (originally slated for March 27 - April 1) and Seaprog (originally June 5-7) have been postponed to later dates, with those dates to be announced. » Read more

2020-03-06
McCoy Typer RIP – Word reaches us today of the passing of one of the most influential pianists in the history of jazz, McCoy Tyner. His tenure with John Coltrane in the early 60s includes some of the most treasured recordings of the era, including My Favorite Things and A Love Supreme. After leaving Coltrane's group, he had a long and successful solo career. He was 81. » Read more

2020-02-18
Jon Christensen RIP – Word reaches us today of the passing of Norwegian drummer Jon Christensen, a musician whose sensitive playing did much to help define the atmospheric sound of ECM jazz recordings. His work with Jan Garbarek, Bobo Stenson, Terje Rypdal, and many more was sensitive and varied, adapting to a wide variety of styles while maintaining a distinct identity of its own. Christensen was 76. » Read more

2020-01-21
Gong Announces UK Tour for 2020 – Having spent the last few years touring the world, including dates in Japan with psych legend Steve Hillage, multiple headline European tours and festivals, America’s Cruise to the Edge festival, a South America headline tour, and a headline performance at Tomorrow Festival in China, the band have won the hearts of both traditional and modern Gong fanbases. During this live journey, Gong has delved further into the truly psychedelic, exploratory, and mind-expanding side of the music. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Dennis Rea - Views from Chicheng Precipice – Classical Chinese poetry, like Japanese haiku, even in English translation, can be very evocative, carefully choosing certain details to trigger the mind to fill in an entire scene. For the most part...  (2011) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues