Exposé Online banner

Klaus Schulze — Timewind
(Revisited Records REV 070, 1975/2007, 2CD)

by Henry Schneider, 2008-01-01:

Timewind Cover art

Next in the Revisited reissue series after Blackdance is Timewind, Klaus’ fifth release, the one he considers his breakout album and the one that brought him worldwide success. Timewind is also the first release with clear references to Richard Wagner. The two tracks, “Bayreuth Return” and “Wahnfried 1883,” are classic Schulze home recordings. Klaus still had the bare minimum of equipment (organ, keyboards, and synths) and used his Revox 2-track tape machine for delays and echo. As such he had to record his music in one take. It wasn’t until Moondawn that Klaus had access to a 16-track machine. It is simply amazing what he was able to achieve with such primitive equipment and the music still sounds fresh today! For bonus material on the reissue, Klaus opted to include a second CD containing three pieces. “Echoes of Time” and “Solar Wind” are unreleased live variations of “Bayreuth Return” and thus fit well in this reissue. The third piece, “Windy Times,” was recorded in 2000 and is based on a sequence from the Timewind session and previously appeared on the promo CD for Contemporary Works 1. An interesting side note is that Klaus received the prestigious Grand Prix du Disque International for Timewind in March 1976, which resulted in every French public library, university, and school purchasing two to three copies for the their archives. Overnight there were orders for 20,000 – 30,000 copies of Timewind!


by Mike McLatchey, 2015-05-07:

McLatchey's Top Tier #23

This album had a massive impact on my teenage brain; it was often the soundtrack of many... voyages. "Bayreuth Return" is still one of those pieces that brings me right back to that time. In particular it was the space-age effects, the spitting, vibrating, helicoptering noises that sit right on top of Schulze's usual minor key backdrop, the quiet twisty sequencing and the almost minimalist soloing. It was really the first time I was faced with music that isn't so much about choruses and bridges but about the drone, the Om sound, something that seems to just sit there but is really being masterfully moved slowly forward even into climax. It was haunting, sad and ultimately eternal. And I probably played Side 1 five times for every spin of Side 2.


Filed under: New releases , 2007 releases, 1975 releases

Related artist(s): Klaus Schulze

More info

Latest news

2017-10-18
Phil Miller RIP – Sad word reaches us today of the passing of another of the great musicians of the Canterbury Scene — guitarist Phil Miller. His distinctive sound added greatly to Matching Mole, Hatfield and the North, and National Health, and he also contributed to albums by Caravan, Dave Stewart $amp; Barbara Gaskin, and many others. He was 68. » Read more

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Ain Soph - Hat and Field – Ain Soph are a post-Canterbury Japanese quartet who have certainly paid their dues, and whose Hat and Field album marks their return to the progressive/jazz scene from a six year hiatus since their...  (1994) » Read more

Thinking Plague - A History of Madness – Most music critics (and listeners too) tend to get caught up in the genre game when describing music. We think in terms of qualities like loud/soft, electric/acoustic, rocks/doesn’t. But there...  (2003) » Read more

K2 - The Book of the Dead – Imagine Progrock Records’ Shawn Gordon’s surprise when he heard from K2 bassist Ken Jaquess that not only Allan Holdsworth but the late Shaun Guerin had agreed to play on his big time...  (2006) » Read more

Sheila Chandra with the Ganges Orchestra - "This Sentence Is True" (The Previous Sentence Is False) – Throughout the 90s, Sheila Chandra recorded albums of solo voice, basically drones with refined, studied melodies and tones above them. That was interesting enough (since I love her voice), but lacked...  (2001) » Read more

Banda Elástica - Maquizcoatl – This is not music in the traditional sense. But don't let this refrain you from sampling a collection of sonic atmospheres exclusively made with acoustic instruments and most noticeably, South...  (1997) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues