Exposé Online banner

Indigo — Silent Memories
(ICD 30.004, 1993, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 1994-05-01

Silent Memories Cover artOne cannot listen to Indigo's latest album without acknowledging that, while, good as some of these musical compositions might be, they tend to be spoiled by powdery and derivative lyrics sung in a second language. Today, Indigo has scaled down to a two-piece of keyboardist, vocalist and longtime bandleader Gerald Krampl, and guitarist Robert Altmann, with a few guests adding voices and such. Krampl's compositional style is comparable to that of Tony Banks but with a bit more Teutonic style in the arrangements, and in fact there is much here that points to the work of Genesis, both early (progressive) and late (pop), but Krampl and company have brought this style forward and have combined it with modern elements to give it a fresh face that is, for the most part, anything but derivative. Even though much of the music here (including drums) is programmed - normally something objectionable - the crafting, spirit, and generally good balance of the music more than make up for it. But that's only half of the story here. The lyrics, the weakest element in the mix here, range from cold to even worse, like "Father Moon," where entire lines, even entire verses are ripped off from mid-period Genesis tracks we all know well. "Box of Dreams" is completely uninspired rambling, and "Cheap Dreams," while intended to convey a serious anti-drug message, is so disjointed that the intent is completely lost. Krampl's voice, a bit thin at times, combined with the thick Austrian accent, do little to help the situation. A couple tracks, the 15 minute album opener "Space Odyssey," and its follow on "Freedom," a track concerning the violence against east-European immigrants coming west seeking freedom, tend to work quite well - both are fairly strong tracks. After that the album becomes spotty at best, eventually degenerating to pure pop towards the end.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 3, 1993 releases

Related artist(s): Indigo

Latest news

2020-01-21
Gong Announces UK Tour for 2020 – Having spent the last few years touring the world, including dates in Japan with psych legend Steve Hillage, multiple headline European tours and festivals, America’s Cruise to the Edge festival, a South America headline tour, and a headline performance at Tomorrow Festival in China, the band have won the hearts of both traditional and modern Gong fanbases. During this live journey, Gong has delved further into the truly psychedelic, exploratory, and mind-expanding side of the music. » Read more

2020-01-15
Carlos Alvarado RIP – Carlos Alvarado, pioneering composer, multi-instrumentalist and pioneer of progressive rock and electronic experimental music in Mexico, passed away January 14th, 2020 at age 68 after a two year battle with cancer.  » Read more

2020-01-12
Wolfgang Dauner RIP – Pianist Wolfgang Dauner, one of the pioneers of both European free jazz and jazz rock, has died at the age of 84. With his own groups and with the United Jazz+Rock Ensemble, his playing and compositions were a prominent presence in European jazz from the mid-60s until just recently. » Read more

2020-01-12
Michael Allison RIP – Michael Allison, who since 1997 has been recording as Darshan Ambient, passed away on January 9th after a long and brave battle with cancer. He has been at at the forefront of the new ambient/electronic music scene, with over eighteen releases to his credit. » Read more

2020-01-10
Neil Peart RIP – One of rock music's defining drummers has died at the age of 67. Neil Peart's work with Rush provided one of the templates for percussion in rock, and he certainly ranks in the top ten most influential drummers of the 20th Century. Peart retired from playing in 2015 due to health issues, and succumbed to brain cancer on January 7, 2020. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Canned Heat / John Lee Hooker - Hooker 'n' Heat, Historical Figures, Ancient Heads, & The New Age – If you don't dig the blues and you don't boogie, skip this review. Canned Heat's stock in trade was merging classic blues with rock, and in the late 60s nobody did it better, due in part...  (2007) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues