Exposé Online banner

Yes — Fly from Here
(Frontiers Records FR CD 520, 2011, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2015-05-12

Fly from Here Cover art

Thinking back to when Yes released Drama in 1980, there was some debate about whether Yes without Jon Anderson was really Yes. That question aside, the album had some great tunes on it, some of which rank with the band’s best (“Tempus Fugit” in particular). Over the span of time since then, even more drastic changes have come and gone for Yes, and Fly from Here finds something of the Drama lineup recreated, with Geoff Downes once again in the fold on keyboards and Trevor Horne also on board (this time as producer rather than lead vocalist). The primary change from that era (or any other) is the presence of Benoît David of the Canadian band Mystery as the main singer; his voice is in the same general register as Jon Anderson’s, and blends with Chris Squire and Steve Howe in a similar manner. It’s his accent that gets in the way of really fitting in — every time he sings “altimeter” on “We Can Fly,” I just cringe. The greater part of this album consists of the title suite, five parts with a preceding “Overture,” and while it falls on the more accessible side of the band’s sound, more poppish in spite of the length, it’s not a bad entry into the Yes canon. The remainder of the album is filled out with a number of shorter tunes, several of which are instantly forgettable; only two stand out: “Life on a Film Set” and “Into the Storm.” These are fine compositions, maybe not the equal of classics like “Long Distance Runaround” and other favorites, but certainly better than most anything the band produced on Big Generator and the like.


Filed under: New releases, 2011 releases

Related artist(s): Steve Howe, Chris Squire, Yes, Alan White, Oliver Wakeman, Geoff Downes

Latest news

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more

2017-04-16
Allan Holdsworth RIP – Surely in the list of artists who have contributed to the sound of modern music, there is a special spot for guitarist Allan Holdsworth. His name is known to virtually every student of the instrument in jazz and rock, and his style has been so widely emulated that it's hardly worth mentioning anymore — we can just assume that every guitarist has Holdsworth as an influence. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Cressida - Asylum – Cressida's second Asylum in my opinion is the best of the genre represented by Beggars' Opera, Spring, Fantasy, Fruupp, and many more. An amazingly elegant album, Asylum was a beautiful...  (1993) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues