Exposé Online banner

Various Artists — Periferic 2002: Space and Art Rock from Hungary
(Periferic BGCD 104, 2002, CD)

by Mike Ezzo, Published 2002-09-01

Periferic 2002: Space and Art Rock from Hungary Cover art

There is a wonderful variety of material on this, the second of such compilations that Periferic has released spotlighting the prog world in Hungary. The CD gets off to a promising start with a pair of bands— D Sound, and You And I— who do very convincing imitations of Eloy/Floyd space rock, and Yes-circa-1976, respectively. After Crying, who seem to be the most popular Hungarian prog band since Solaris, finish things off with their well known brand of symphonic sounds. In between are six more bands. Colorstar and Korai Öröm cover the more modernized hip end of the spectrum with their slightly technofied styles that also reach back into psychedelia, the latter being similar to Ozric Tentacles. After All goes for the jugular in a Dream Theater-meets-90s-Crimson grungy track that sounds like it was written in California. Mini and Toth Bagi Band play more by the rules but still satisfy artistically speaking. The former presents a jam-heavy instrumental; the latter a vocal song in a blend of reggae/pop/jazz/etc. I’ll save the best two for last. Kada are simply awe-inspiring, in a loose improvisational mode that exudes nothing but taste, class and elegance, only subtly hinting along the way at where their path leads. And Mindflower was a big surprise. Their instrumental offering features intimate interplay between guitar, bass, and drums, whose crack dynamic ensemble virtue bespeaks a band that has been performing together for years. There is something for everyone on this CD and all of it is worthy of attention.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 25, 2002 releases

Related artist(s): After Crying, Tóth Bagi Csaba, Korai Öröm

Latest news

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Ensemble Nimbus - Key Figures – Amazing when a new label takes off so well. Ad Perpetuam Memoriam has given the world both the powerful Kultivator and the hilarious Myrbein, both relatively unknown Swedish groups of high quality....  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues