Exposé Online banner

Satoko Fujii / Joe Fonda — Duet
(Long Song SRDC 140/2016, 2016, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2017-10-28

Duet Cover art

For the attentive reader of Exposé, pianist, composer and bandleader Satoko Fujii needs no introduction; her work in jazz, classical, and free improv has been documented and reviewed in dozens of releases, solo, in collaboration with her partner Natsuki Tamura, and in various ensembles small and large throughout the last thirty years. Virtuoso bassist Joe Fonda may be lesser known to our readers, though his work performing with a number of jazz groups (Barry Altschul’s 3dom Factor, Joe Fonda’s Bottoms Out, Conference Call, and dozens more) and as a sideman (Anthony Braxton, Carlo Morena, Wadada Leo Smith, and many more) is highly respected throughout the jazz world. While Fujii was in New York at the end of 2015, Fonda reached out and organized several duet concerts, the music at hand being taken from the second of those concerts on November 20 in Portland, Maine. The opener and centerpiece of Duet is the 37-minute improv piece titled “Paul Bley,” obviously a nod to the great, late Canadian jazz pianist, who was still alive at that time. Throughout, Fujii and Fonda are on fire, a magical rapport existing between them that flows effortlessly as the two proceed along their telepathic journey, each seeming to anticipate the next move of the other. For the second set, they are joined by trumpeter Natsuki Tamura for a shorter 11-minute improvisation “JSN,” which begins in more measured and relaxed territory, with Tamura’s trumpet and sound effects (with Fonda joining in on flute at one point) adding another new dimension to the proceedings, and quite a change from the earlier piece. All taken, these two sets captures an amazing evening of pure improvisational magic.


Filed under: New releases, 2016 releases

Related artist(s): Satoko Fujii, Natsuki Tamura, Joe Fonda

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Five Fifteen - Six Dimensions of the Electric Camembert – For their fourth album (the first I’ve heard), Finland’s Five Fifteen continue their tradition of long psychedelic titles. Gong fans don’t be fooled, the mention of the French cheese...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues