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Panzerpappa — Koralrevens Klagsang
(Hangar B DHCCD501, 2006, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2007-03-01

Koralrevens Klagsang Cover art

It’s been a few years since anything new from Panzerpappa has crossed this desk. Skillful denizens of the playful Canterbury-esque jazz-rock realm, the four-piece has undergone some changes since their earlier Hulemysteriet (that’s the last one this writer has heard) reviewed in issue 28’s roundtable section, including replacement of half the band! New members include bassist / keyboardist Anders Kristian Krabberød and guitarist / accordionist Jarle Storløken, who join veteran drummer / multi-instrumentalist Trond Gjellum and saxophonist / keyboardist Steinar Børve. All four share the vocal parts on eight of the nine tracks (which are essentially instrumentals), but on the one song with lyrics they couldn’t have done much better than to recruit the assistance of guest crooner Richard Sinclair, who adds his trademark singing style to “Vintervake.” Also to the guest list add various players on tuba, trumpet, french horn, flute, trombone, vibraphone, and clarinet, track depending, as needed. At this point one should be assembling an image of a highly versatile ensemble that’s totally comfortable across a fairly diverse range of material; also one that can mysteriously morph as a piece evolves and end up in someplace entirely different than where they began. Based on the strength of the writing alone – which is shared among the various group members, Panzerpappa shows an amazing level of subtlety and brilliance, enhanced further by their skill and confidence as players and arrangers. Every listen reveals something new!


Filed under: New releases, Issue 34, 2006 releases

Related artist(s): Panzerpappa, Richard Sinclair

More info
http://panzerpappa.bandcamp.com/album/koralrevens-klagesang

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