Exposé Online banner

Miriodor — Signal 9
(Cuneiform Rune 438, 2017, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2017-08-19

Signal 9 Cover art

Yes, this is indeed the ninth Miriodor studio album, coming three decades after their first and four years after the previous effort, Cobra Fakir. Signal 9 finds the band in the quartet arrangement that has lasted since just after Cobra Fakir: Pascal Globensky (keyboards), Rémi Leclerc (drums), Bernard Falaise (guitar), and Nicolas Lessard (bass). The addition of Lessard seems to have steered the band in a more energetic direction, with his rhythmic (sometimes almost funky) bass lines locking in with Leclerc’s drums and providing a groove to many tracks in spite of the shifting rhythmic structures and often crazy melodies that make up the pieces. There are sections where the band gets into a groove and rides it for a couple of minutes, and at other times they’ll throw out ideas rapid-fire, jumping from one to another like indecisive squirrels running from tree to tree. “Portrait-robot” is one of my favorite tracks, and exhibits the band’s strengths admirably. It starts with an insistent unison riff on bass and guitar while odd synth noises bounce around, then adds organ chords to gradually build up the intensity almost like a post-rock epic. By the time they’re two minutes in, they’re thrashing away with punkish abandon and there’s a wild synthesizer line wiggling around on top. Then it all comes to a crashing halt and we’re left with indistinct ambient noises, from which a Mellotron choir emerges amidst distorted analog synth noises. This leads into a section that could almost pass for Änglagård, with a heavy plodding beat and prominent Mellotron chords. Then there’s a quirky circus-like part with the sounds of a cheering crowd, followed by a faster tempo section that builds up again and features dissonant chords. It ends with a long fade to nothingness. In addition to longer tracks like “Portrait-robot,” there are a number of short vignettes, some collages of sounds, others more composed and performed. There are too many highlights to cover in a review — suffice it to say that Signal 9 stands comfortably among Miriodor’s best releases, and is a sure bet for the year’s best list.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): Miriodor, Bernard Falaise

More info
http://cuneiformrecords.bandcamp.com/album/signal-9

Latest news

2018-02-18
Didier Lockwood RIP – Word reaches us today of the death of one of France's great jazz musicians, violinist Didier Lockwood. His playing bridged many worlds, from traditional jazz to fusion to progressive rock, and his talent can be heard on recordings by Magma, Clearlight, Pierre Moerlen's Gong, and many more. Lockwood was 62. » Read more

2018-02-15
10 Years of Fruits de Mer - The Incomplete Angler – Those of you who are faithful followers of Exposé will know that we have been promoting Fruits de Mer and its side labels and releases from nearly its first year. Now music journalist and author Dave Thompson has written a book chronicling the past ten years as a celebration of this milestone. » Read more

2018-02-14
Tom Rapp RIP – Singer / songwriter Tom Rapp, best known with the band Pearls Before Swine, passed away on February 12, at the age of 70, after a battle with cancer. » Read more

2018-01-30
Bill Bruford Ventures into Uncharted Territory – Drum master Bill Bruford, veteran of some of the most creative bands in history (King Crimson, Yes, Genese, etc.), is sharing some of what he's learned about being a drummer and a musician in his new book, Uncharted: Creativity and the Expert Drummer, out on University of Michigan Press. » Read more

2018-01-18
Christian Burchard RIP – Multi-instrumentalist Christian Burchard, who founded the seminal band Embryo in 1969, has died at the age of 71. His January 17 passing was announced on the band's Facebook page. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Satori - Tick – This is one of those albums that seems rather irrelevant in the scheme of things. Not that it's bad, but there are tons of ambient albums even with prominent guitar that are much better. This...  (1996) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues