Exposé Online banner

Indrek Patte — Celebration
(Strangiato Records 2005, 2011, CD)

by Paul Hightower, 2014-01-17:

Celebration Cover art If you ever need to know who produced progressive rock’s archetypal music just listen to the many musicians openly using them as a template. Estonian musician Indrek Patte is a case in point. It took me 30 seconds into the opener “Resurrection” to spot the “Firth of Fifth” references. Likewise with “Learn to Live” (“A Trick of the Tail”), “One Way” (Gentle Giant), “Shine” (Yes), “Celebration” (Steve Hackett), etc. “Mount Meggido” — a sort of Deep Purple/Dream Theatre mashup — keeps its references buried deep enough below the 80s stadium rock sound infusing most of the record that it wasn’t such a distraction. I don’t mind a good homage (IQ’s “Harvest of Souls” for example) but Patte needs to learn how to distinguish between capturing the spirit of a song as opposed to merely mimicking the sounds and songwriting. Even though his name is on it, this is really a band project with Patte (vocals, keys, 12-string, drum programming) augmented by guest guitarists, bassists, and even some strings and sax. As a result Celebration is very full-bodied and robust album, with a nice spread across the sound spectrum. I can’t comment on the English lyrics, which are heavily Christian in nature (even on the hair-metal homage “You Stay with Me”), but Patte might want to consider hiring a singer for any future endeavors as his own singing suffers from a husky rasp and heavy accent. He clearly put a lot of work into this album. Now Patte just needs to find his own voice.

by Peter Thelen, 2013-04-01:

Patte is an Estonian composer, multi-instrumentalist and singer, and a veteran of several bands – the only one of which this writer is familiar with is Ruja. Here he delivers eight superbly arranged tracks in the classic progressive rock vein, handling vocals, 12-string guitar, keyboards, percussion and drum programming, with a number of other musicians supporting on bass, guitars, flute, strings, and saxes. Patte's voice is powerful, and a little on the rough side, not unlike Peter Gabriel on his early solo albums. As far as his compositions and arrangements go, there are frequent reminders of the styles of mid-period Genesis (the song "Learn to Live" is hauntingly similar to "A Trick of the Tail"), mid-period Gentle Giant, and to a lesser degree Yes, early Marillion, plus, as the disc progresses, we hear some prog-metal influences come to the fore. Okay, this may sound like I'm ripping it for lack of originality, which is certainly not the case at all. In fact there are plenty of well-executed ideas throughout this disc that are nothing short of exceptional, and the production is surprisingly good. But it does fit nicely within those stylistic boundaries, much like Spock's Beard's early work, Flower Kings and any of a number of other contemporary prog bands. Which, in summary means that many readers are going to find plenty herein to enjoy.

Filed under: New releases , Issue 40 , 2011 releases

Related artist(s): Indrek Patte

More info
http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/indrekpatte

Latest news

2021-01-18
Asia Minor Third Album on the Way – On January 29, AMS records will be releasing the long-awaited third album by classic Turkish-French band Asia Minor. Released last year in Japan, this will be the widespread debut of Points of Libration. The album features original members Setrak Bakirel (vocals, guitar) and Eril Tekeli (flute, guitar). » Read more

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Visible Touch - Forgotten Land & Vienna – They're called Visible Touch though they have nothing whatsoever to do with 80s Genesis or any Genesis for that matter. Think instead of all those great 80s hair-farmer bands: The Scorpions, Judas...  (1999) » Read more

Kenso - Kenso II – Another welcome reissue, prices for original LPs of Kenso's extremely rare first and second albums have been soaring skyward in the last few years, beyond the reach of the average progressive music...  (1993) » Read more

Gong - The Birthday Party – Just what the world needs, another live album by Gong!?! On some terms The Birthday Party can be compared to the live albums released by their conceptually inferior contemporaries, Hawkwind, for...  (1996) » Read more

Ange - 1995 Musea Reissues – These seven titles by the legendary Ange represent part of Musea's big score from absorbing the Baillemont label late last year. Although most of these have been released on CD before — not once,...  (1995) » Read more

Mestari - Mestari – Recorded in 1993, this four-piece jazz quartet featuring Yochk'o Seffer on various saxes was a logical precursor to the new Zao album, and while the latter more closely approaches progressive, Mestari...  (1995) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues