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Dan Pound — Change of Weather
(Pound Sounds PS17, 2015, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2015-08-09

Change of Weather Cover art

Dan Pound is a virtuoso electronic composer and musician, crafting visual and emotive musical canvases with his palette of synthesizers and other equipment. Each Dan Pound release I have reviewed for Exposé is based on a theme clearly communicated via the music. Change of Weather is his 17th solo release, with six electronic tone poems seguing seamlessly across its 52 minutes. The first two tracks are Parts I and II of “Through the Fog,” a title that immediately brings the ambient artist Jeff Greinke to mind. Over the course of 25 minutes Dan takes you from pre-dawn fog to mid-morning when it finally clears. Carl Sandburg’s poem Fog may even have been the inspiration for this piece:

The fog comes
on little cat feet.

It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.

However, when the fog clears, it is not to sunlight but rain, leading into “After the Rain.” In the distance you hear the rumble of thunder underpinning the dripping water and pulsating drones. As the sun emerges, we find ourselves in a steamy “Rainforest” with cheery sequencers emulating dappled sunlight. This is a very beautiful piece accompanied by Andean pipes reminiscent of Popol Vuh’s Aguirre soundtrack. Approaching evening, “A Different Wind” picks up to cool things down. This is slow, floating music when about half-way into the track sequencers arrive to propel you further towards night. The closing track is the quiet and blissful “Moon Tide Rising.” Darkness descends and the moon gently tugs you along in the slow currents and shifting layers of dripping sounds. Quite a remarkable and enjoyable listening experience.


Filed under: New releases, 2015 releases

Related artist(s): Dan Pound

More info
http://danpoundmusic.com/change-of-weather

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