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Chris Squire RIP

The sad news comes today that legendary bass player Chris Squire has died. After treatment for acute erythroid leukemia in Phoenix, he passed away at his home on 28 June, 2015, aged 67.

by Jon Davis, Published 2015-06-28

All of our readers here at Exposé are surely well aware of Squire's impact on music, both as a bassist and the key member of Yes. There is hardly a bassist in rock (or any other genre, for that matter) who hasn't been influenced by Squire's melodic, aggressive style. And his voice acted as a perfect foil for the lead vocals of Jon Anderson, becoming one of the defining factors of Yes's music.

Christopher Russell Edward Squire was born 4 March 1948 in London, and took up the bass guitar after hearing The Beatles. He dropped out of school in 1964, and joined his first band shortly thereafter. His trademark instrument was the Rickenbacker 4001, and he first came to public attention with The Syn. In 1968 he met Jon Anderson, and Yes was soon founded.

Tributes have been pouring out for Squire from all around the world. Progressive rock has lost one of its greats. Get out your favorite Yes album and have a listen in his honor.


Filed under: Obituaries

Related artist(s): Chris Squire, Yes

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