Exposé Online banner

Various Artists — Lost Years in Labyrinth II
(Belle Antique 9589, 1995, CD)

by Mike Ezzo, 1996-03-01:

Lost Years in Labyrinth II Cover art

Unlike volume one, there is no theme governing this one other than the fact that all the groups record for Belle Antique. They have intended it as a sort of beginner's guide. All the songs are unique to this release, which includes : Bi Kyo Ran, Negasphere, Alan Case, Trembling Strain, and Cinema. Since Lost Years In Labyrinth II was reviewed in Exposé #7 I'll try not to be redundant. Some may wonder about the inclusion of Dutch songwriter Alan Case. This kind of lyrical, elaborate "pomp-rock" is very big in Japan; as witness the recent interest raised over two of Case's fellow countrymen: Valensia and Robby Valentine. No doubt he is influenced by them. Cinema's piece succeeds in really capturing a unique gothic spirit. Short and to-the-point, with beautiful instrumentation (I love the combination of violin and bazouki), it's more evocative than most of the material on their full album. Bi Kyo Ran is represented by an alternate live take on the epic-length "Double," from their debut. Negasphere's Genesis / Hackett-inspired instrumental seems lacking in vitality given the glut of neo-prog born since the time they were active. Trembling Strain's contribution is another idiosyncratic blend, like their own album. Here they use jew's harp, dumbek, and biwa – all very sparingly. The result is a stark, barren musical landscape that, like a Japanese painting, suggests as much by what it leaves out as by what it includes.

Most people look for one of two things in a compilation : an introduction to new groups; or a collection of music in a single genre. Volume 2 instead adopts the something-for-everybody approach. Think of it as an introduction to Belle Antique.


by Peter Thelen, 1995-07-01:

Remember Lost Years in Labyrinth? It featured material by four Japanese Canterbury-ish/Chamber Rock bands — Lacrymosa, Il Berlione, Zypressen, and Soft Weed Factor. OK, now forget it. There is almost no similarity between the original and Lost Years II; in fact with this new collection there seems to be no unifying thread at all, except that all the artists are Japanese — no! Wait a minute, that's not even correct, the first two tracks on Lost Years II are by Dutch multi-instrumentalist/composer Alan Case, English lyrics and all. Case opens with his eleven minute project opus "Fast Asleep," playing all keyboards, acoustic and electric guitars, lead and backing vocals, and drum machine programming. Other musicians provide additional guitars and harp, as well as a two part female chorus. The long instrumental parts of this are quite interesting (spoiled somewhat by drum machine, though), but the vocal parts are typical rock stuff, reminding me of Canadian Larry Gowan. Case's second track "Dark Nights" is your basic four-minute pop track, a good song, but one that doesn't really belong here at all. A live take of "Double" from Bi Kyo Ran's first album is next up — this is the legendary Japanese band that sounded more like King Crimson than Crimson themselves. The recording quality ain't great, but it's as good as anything on their Who-Ma or Fairy Tale albums. Negasphere's nine-minute instrumental begins with a beautiful piano solo and then moves right into a powerful progressive rock riff with biting guitar lead. Trembling Strain's "Music for Aerial Sepulture" is basically Pneuma with two vocalists, using jews-harp, traditional Japanese instruments (biwa?) and percussion. Cinema's "Take" also features an odd lineup of instruments, including bouzouki, violin, ocarina, and female voice, perhaps reminding of Lacrymosa's contribution on Lost Years 1. There you have it — six tracks, a little shy of an hour. Although parts of the Case stuff is a tad mainstream, and the Bi Kyo Ran is a little tiring, the album gets much better as it goes along. Your mileage may vary.


Filed under: New releases , Issue 7 , 1995 releases

Related artist(s): Bi Kyo Ran / Madoromi, Various Artists, Pneuma, Alan Case, Cinema, Trembling Strain, Negasphere

More info

Latest news

2017-10-18
Phil Miller RIP – Sad word reaches us today of the passing of another of the great musicians of the Canterbury Scene — guitarist Phil Miller. His distinctive sound added greatly to Matching Mole, Hatfield and the North, and National Health, and he also contributed to albums by Caravan, Dave Stewart $amp; Barbara Gaskin, and many others. He was 68. » Read more

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Gert Emmens - When Darkness Falls upon This Earth – One shouldn’t take a title like this too literally when it concerns Gert Emmens. The only darkness that is evoked on this album are the dark coloured synth textures in the beginning of several...  (2006) » Read more

Early Day Miners - Placer Found – Well, the Exposé credo is to spotlight the boundaries of rock, so that must mean this young American group fits the mold. Unlike the mostly Euro-prog based music we cover, EDM has a truly...  (2001) » Read more

Via Lumini - Vôos e Sonhos – This was the last Progressive Rock Worldwide release to appear in LP format, and as of yet has not been reissued on CD. Unlike the Tellah album, this release was by a new young band from Sao Paulo....  (1997) » Read more

Outrageous Cherry - The Book of Spectral Projections & Supernatural Equinox – Since its founding in the early 90s, Outrageous Cherry has been working on their own method of updating 60s psychedelia for a later generation. Matthew Smith’s songwriting often captures the...  (2005) » Read more

Barry Cleveland - Volcano – For this outing, San Francisco Bay Area guitarist Barry Cleveland has enlisted a troop of comrades in his effort to bridge the gulf between western musical idioms and those beyond these shores. Though...  (2005) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues