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Uwe Cremer / Thomas Rydell — Sirius Singularity
(ThomasRydellMusic trmcd003, 2012, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-03-21

Sirius Singularity Cover art

When I interviewed Uwe Cremer in Köln in 2011 he told me that one of his current musical projects was a collaboration with Swedish soundtrack composer Thomas Rydell. Their first joint release, Sirius Singularity, was then released in 2012. This debut release contains three slow instrumental tracks that marry Krautrock and orchestral music. The title track opens the disc with an ambient intro that resolves into acoustic guitar and swells of orchestral sounds. Crystalline sequencers pick up the tempo of this slow introspective arrangement to be replaced by Uwe’s heavy rock guitar and drums. The music seamlessly transitions back and forth between the orchestra and Uwe’s Krautrock with several motifs that continue throughout the piece with various instrumental changes that maintains the listeners attention and builds tension. The second track, “Revisiting the Museum,” is a sound poem beginning with sounds of someone walking on gravel, breaking glass, and an alarm. Then Uwe and Thomas take you into an eerie cavernous space with subliminal chanting and unidentifiable woodwind or string instruments. They add layers of sounds, adding and subtracting musical elements. This amorphous approach leaves you expecting something to happen. After about 10 minutes Uwe’s sequencers enter and provide a purpose that propels the music forward to a beautiful slow climax. The final track, “Gizeh Intelligence,” is another fairly slow instrumental track that takes you into a dark gothic avant garde world that eventually resolves into Uwe’s rocking guitar riffing with a mid-Eastern flavor. Sirius Singularity is quite a musical treat!


Filed under: New releases, 2012 releases

Related artist(s): Level ∏ (Uwe Cremer), Thomas Rydell

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