Exposé Online banner

Flamin' Groovies — Live 1971 San Francisco
(RockBeat ROC-3372, 1971/2017, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-07-27

Live 1971 San Francisco Cover art

When Bill Graham closed the Fillmore West in 1971, there was a solid five days of concerts to honor the venue. Proto-punk garage rockers the Flamin’ Groovies were one of those acts. The band had endured a love / hate relationship with Graham due to the fact the their first manager had been Bill’s right-hand man and when he quit to manage the Flamin’ Groovies it took its toll. In the late 60s and early 70s the Flamin’ Groovies were the house band for two summers in a row at LA’s Whiskey-A-Go-Go where they enjoyed respect. However, when they played the Fillmore West, they were treated like dirt, be it the treatment from the staff, stage manager, sound people, ticket takers, light show, etc. And that is in evidence in the awful sound quality of this live recording. The sound is muffled and tinny. The cymbals and drums overpower the music, with the vocals so far down in the mix that sometimes it is difficult to understand the lyrics, let alone enjoy the performance. During their set, they ran through several cover tunes “I Can’t Explain,” “Sweet Little Rock and Roller,” “Have You Seen My Baby,” “Shakin’ All Over,” “Louie, Louie,” and “Walkin’ the Dog,” interspersed with a few original numbers: the extended psych jam of “Road House,” the boogie tune “Doctor Boogie,” the blues rock of “Slow Death,” and the garage rock “Teenage Head.” The performance sounds a little rough around the edges, which could be the fault of the recording. But you can tell that the crowd loved them. However, due to the below par quality of this recording, there really is nothing to recommend, unless you are a Flamin’ Groovies completest.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases, 1971 recordings

Related artist(s): The Flamin' Groovies

Latest news

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more

2020-09-05
Gary Peacock RIP – Legendary bassist Gary Peacock, veteran of many recordings and performances with Paul Bley, George Russell, Roland Kirk, Bill Evans, Tony Williams, and many more. » Read more

2020-07-22
Tim Smith RIP – Tim Smith, leader of the eccentric band Cardiacs, has died at the age of 59 after many years of health problems. Cardiacs was known for intense and complicated music that combined punk energy with the rhythmic and harmonic sophistication of progressive rock. » Read more

2020-07-12
Judy Dyble RIP – Singer-songwriter Judy Dyble, who was a founding member of Fairport Convention and one of the distinctive voices of the 60s folk revival in Britain, has died at the age of 71. Her passing came at the end of a long illness, though which she continued to work. » Read more

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Porcupine Tree - In Absentia – With In Absentia, Steven Wilson and company add a few new tricks to their musical bag, the first being really heavy riffing. Not that a heavy riff is anything new to this band, but these are...  (2003) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues