Exposé Online banner

Steve Verity — Digital Planet
(Atomic City ATOM CD 03, 1995, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2016-07-28

Digital Planet Cover art

I tried to like this CD, I really did! When I first popped it in my CD player the first few seconds of music blew me away! I thought wow! Here is a new artist composing electronic music akin to Klaus Schulze’s classic Picture Music. But after repeated listenings I feel compelled to offer some constructive criticism and hope that Steve Verity’s next release will satisfy my initial expectations. Verity apparently loves high frequency crystalline sounds layered on top of sluggish chord washes. Here is a little lesson in acoustics, kids. Please don’t make the same mistake he did. For a given volume, level high frequency sounds have greater energy than low frequency sounds. That is why high notes always sound louder than low notes when played at the same volume. That is also why your ears hurt or become tired after listening too long to high frequencies. Therein lies the main problem with Digital Planet — 60 minutes of the same high frequency timbres and little to no bass activity. His sonic spectrum is just too full, resulting in a muddy sound. In addition, Verity does not vary his tempo from song to song. My ears and brain just can’t last the hour, let alone make it through the 29 minutes of the opening track "Tales from a Digital Planet." "Less is more" is an excellent principle to apply to composition. Through judicious culling of his sonic events Verity could greatly enhance his music. About the only way you can enjoy this debut CD is in small doses of five to six minutes. I can only hope that Verity will learn from this initial outing and continue to compose and record. The potential is there.


Filed under: New releases, 1995 releases

Related artist(s): Steve Verity

Latest news

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more

2017-04-16
Allan Holdsworth RIP – Surely in the list of artists who have contributed to the sound of modern music, there is a special spot for guitarist Allan Holdsworth. His name is known to virtually every student of the instrument in jazz and rock, and his style has been so widely emulated that it's hardly worth mentioning anymore — we can just assume that every guitarist has Holdsworth as an influence. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Ash Ra Tempel - The Private Tapes – Germany — 1971 — Underground. Those three terms evoke images of the Berlin Wall, intensity, angst, freedom. And no band helped define this milieu more than Ash Ra Tempel. With a long...  (1996) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues