Exposé Online banner

Simon McKechnie — From My Head to My Feet
(Voyager 5, 2016, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2016-02-29

From My Head to My Feet Cover art

I’m sure everyone who read my review of Simon McKechnie’s previous album, Newton’s Alchemy, went out and bought a copy. Right? It was one of the best progressive rock releases of 2014, and now in the early part of 2016 he has a follow-up. From My Head to My Feet, unlike its predecessor, isn’t unified by an overall concept, but that doesn’t hurt anything. Musically it all holds together as a bright example of how good progressive rock can be even more than 40 years on from its inception. These seven tracks are complex and catchy, superbly performed, and full of the kind of details that bear repeated listening. Once again, McKechnie handles the bulk of the instruments himself (guitars, keys, bass, and so on), with guests on drums (Adam Riley), woodwinds (Richard Exall), and backing vocals (Imogen Small). The arrangement of the woodwind parts in particular is excellent – they are integrated into the overall sound and don’t seem gratuitous or out of place, as saxophones sometimes do in progressive rock. Two of the tracks are instrumental, including the longest, “Once upon a Time.” For the vocal tunes, we get one setting of a poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley, one with lyrics adapted from writings on an ancient Egyptian tomb, and three McKechnie originals. But regardless of the source material, every track is a winner, melodic without being overly pretty, and certainly lacking any hint of the sterility that can come from massively-overdubbed one-man productions. From My Head to My Feet is loads of fun, and easily one of the best progressive releases in recent memory. So click on the link below and do what you have to to support this artist.


Filed under: New releases, 2016 releases

Related artist(s): Simon McKechnie

More info
http://www.simonmckechnie.com/#/from-my-head-to-my-feet/4591350397

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Earthstone - Seed – Chris Phillips is the mastermind behind Earthstone, today a band, but at the time of this recording essentially a one man project with guesting from producer Chris Bond (keys) and Marc Richards...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues