Exposé Online banner

Salim Ghazi Saeedi — United Ubiquity of Flesh
((Not on label) , 2017, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2017-07-09

United Ubiquity of Flesh Cover art

Much has changed since Saeedi’s last album namoWoman (2012), which is hinted at by the empty outline of a man’s body inside the borders of a country, presumably his native Iran, where Saeedi grew up and released a handful of albums with his band Arashk, then three more solo albums in the years following. The empty outline signifies his absence, and the territorial limitations he faced there as a composer and musician. Now having migrated to Australia since his previous album, this latest release, United Ubiquity of Flesh, finds a fresh turn in the lack of confinement with more freedom of expression and musical liberation, while still retaining the essence and memories of the music of his homeland. This is gritty instrumental guitar-driven power rock, with a definite middle-eastern feel, modal scales, blistering solos, and free-wheeling improvisational feel. Saeedi plays all the instrumentation himself, rhythm and solo guitars, bass, drums, and keyboards, as well as handling the mixing and production, right down to the cover design — this is one man’s singular vision. In that respect, this is very different from his three previous solo releases, which include Iconophobic (2010), and Human Encounter (2011), and in fact sometimes bears more in common with his work with his early band Arashk. Several years have passed since, and this may be his time to reflect on that sound and rework some of the embryonic conceptual ideas that were developed in that timeframe. The power and fortitude on display throughout this latest release result in a relentless and uncommon hybrid of eastern and western ideas, perhaps what King Crimson might have sounded like had they grown up in the middle east instead of Britain.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): Salim Ghazi Saeedi

Latest news

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Mawwal - This Is All There Is, There Is No Other Place – The first Mawwal release was one of the highlights of 2007, and here they’ve done it again for 2008, and not by simply remaking the first album. While many of the things that made Black Flies so...  (2009) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues