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Rudolf Heimann — Die Unendlichkeit des Augenblicks
(Spheric Music SMCD 8306, 2019, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2019-06-08

Die Unendlichkeit des Augenblicks Cover art

Electronic musician Rudoph Heimann is back with a new album, which is possibly his best to date, Die Unendlichkeit des Augenblicks or The Infinity of the Moment. This new album poses some deep philosophical questions, such as does God exist? What is infinity? What is reality? etc. While not answering these questions, Heimann invites us to ponder them as he takes us on an electronic journey through Berlin School electronics, a bit of New Age, spiritual Krautrock, and experimental music. The album opens with “Wem die Stunde Schlägt” or ”For Whom the Bell Tolls,” a melodic Berlin School electronic piece with a strong analog synth lead. This is followed by “Ad Infinitum,” a wonderfully majestic instrumental built from repeated lines layered progressively from different registers on a church organ, with a Mellotron taking lead to close the track. The moody cinematic “Monolith” follows, with drums, guitars, organ, and Mellotron choir voices that grow on you. Then Heimann takes us back to Berlin with the Tangerine Dream inspired “Vanitas.” This piece is a great example of the cyclic music so prominent on Spheric Music. Then we encounter the mournful “Niemand Kennt Zeit Noch Stunde” which I cannot get a good translation of, but I think means no one knows the time of their death. “Ewigkeit” or “Eternity” follows with pseudo water sounds, white noise, and digital synths, which gives it a New Age vibe. And the album closes with the 32-minute “Rede des Toten Christus vom Weltgebäude Herab, Dass Kein Gott Sei,” based around a piece written by Romanticist Jean Paul in 1797 and narrated by Roland Paroth. The recitation cuts back and forth between Hiemann’s music that shifts from cinematic electronics, spiritual Popol Vuh territory, church organ, processed hellish voices, to abstract electronics. The text is a non-biblical desolate view of an alternative reality, totally humanizing Christ and ignoring his divinity, thereby doubting the very existence of God himself.


Filed under: New releases, 2019 releases

Related artist(s): Rudolf Heimann

More info
http://store.cdbaby.com/cd/heimann4

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