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Reviews

Orme — L'Infinito
(Crisler CCD 3065, 2004, CD)

by Paul Hightower, Published 2006-05-01

L'Infinito Cover art

Le Orme should win a prize for Most Consistent Band. From Felona e Sorona through to Il Fiume and now with L’Infinito, there’s an unmistakable continuity in terms of writing and arranging, instrumental execution, and sheer spirit that is immediately identifiable with this group. In some circles, old-school symphonic prog rock of this kind is passé. For me it’s a not-so-guilty pleasure, especially when the product is this good. It’s hard to resist when Andrea Bassato lays down a killer electric violin solo on “Si Puó Immaginare,” or when Michele Bon rips out an organ solo from the same song that would put a smile on Keith Emerson’s face. The next track features a tender and mature solo piano composition of Bassato’s leading into “Canto,” which is as good an example of symphonic prog rock as you’ll find these days. After all that comes the Indian-flavored “La Ruota del Cielo,” featuring Aldo Tagliapietra’s sitar paired against Bassato’s violin in a flavorful and exotic flurry of bliss nimbly driven along by Michi Del Rossi’s brisk snare work. And this only represents half of what L’Infinito has to offer. Other bands have tapped the positive energy flowing from Le Orme (Flower Kings most notably), though none do it better than the original. Finally, kudos to a production and mix that gives the whole thing a very live sound, particularly the drums, that adds even more vitality to what is already a lively affair. Needless to say, highly recommended.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 33, 2004 releases

Related artist(s): Le Orme

 

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