Exposé Online banner

Noah Preminger — Genuinity
(Criss Cross Jazz 1397, 2018, CD / DL)

by Jon Davis, Published 2018-06-19

Genuinity Cover art

This quartet outing finds three-fourths of the group from Preminger’s Meditations on Freedom returning. Jason Palmer (trumpet) and Kim Cass (double bass) join Preminger (tenor sax) and newcomer Dan Weiss (drums). The result is similar in many ways to that previous album, presenting a fresh take on post-bop jazz from a small ensemble without a chordal instrument. Preminger is a master at arranging the two horns to complement each other, sometimes playing unison lines reminiscent of Charlie Parker classics, sometimes harmonizing, sometimes playing different lines that interweave. Both Preminger and Palmer are great soloists whose technique doesn’t get in the way of interesting exposition. They freely explore the ranges of their instruments, balancing outside elements with conventional notes, with imagination and creativity front and center. Cass provides a variety of different types of bass, from propulsive lines to chords and slides, moving beyond basic walking and ostinatos. He gets a few solo spots as well, and acquits himself well. Weiss is a drummer with an impressive resume (recently covered with Rudresh Mahanthappa and Rez Abbasi), and while he sticks with the kit on Genuinity — no tablas here — he shows why he’s rapidly becoming one of my favorite jazz drummers. He treats post-bop jazz drumming as a substrate that underlies his own ideas, which seem to have aspects of tabla creeping in — or maybe it’s my imagination building on what I know of his studies. His use of the toms in particular is distinctive. Preminger’s compositions are uniformly excellent, providing springboards for creative exploration by the players, and there are plenty of variations in structure and form, straying from typical head / solos / recap vectors. Genuinity is one of my favorites in the world of acoustic jazz in the last year or so, and is highly recommended for anyone looking for a fix of the classic sound that’s not pure reverent rehashing of old ideas.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Noah Preminger, Dan Weiss

More info
http://www.noahpreminger.com/buy/genuinity-wav

Latest news

2018-07-09
Soft Machine Set to Release New Music – It's been 50 years since The Soft Machine changed the face of music with their first album. Their blend of psychedelic rock and jazz was unique, and while the band went through many changes before disbanding in 1981 — by which time there were no original members remaining — they remained an innovative force with a style all their own. » Read more

2018-07-01
7d Surfaces Happy Rhodes Back Catalog – We've covered singer Happy Rhodes before, both for her solo work and recently with The Security Project, but her 11 albums have been hard to track down. Until now. 7d features high-quality downloads of all her releases, and several of them are also available on CD. » Read more

2018-06-25
Fred Chalenor RIP – We have news of another sad passing in the world of creative music. Bassist Fred Chalenor, whose creativity featured on albums by Tone Dogs, Caveman Shoestore, and many more, died on June 23, 2018 after a long battle with Alzheimer's. Tributes have poured in from the many musicians and fans whose lives he touched. » Read more

2018-06-13
Jon Hiseman RIP – One of the great drummers of the rock era has died. Jon Hiseman was a veteran of such ground-breaking groups as Colosseum (I and II), Tempest, John Mayal's Bleusbreakers, and was a founding member of the innovative large band United Jazz + Rock Ensemble. » Read more

2018-06-05
Koenjihyakkei Seeks Funding for New Album – It's been quite a few years since the last new studio album by the amazing Koenjihyakkei. Now they are preparing Dhormimviskha for worldwide release, and they're asking fans to pre-order via a Kickstarter campaign to help it happen. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Threshold - Clone – Given that this is a Karl Groom project, and that it's on the GEP label, and that the first tune is called "Freaks," you would be pretty safe to assume this is another tired and unwanted neo-prog...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues