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Moth Effect — Crocodilians
(Sunstone 1002, 2015, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2015-06-29

Crocodilians Cover art

Moth Effect is a one-man band with no other identifying information. He does not sing, he is not flashy, but he does compose and play trance-inducing instrumentals reminiscent of 70s Kosmiche Musik and Krautrock. This incognito Brit studied 60s and 70s psych, garage rock, and New Wave to create Crocodilians, his first LP release. There are ten lovely little tunes on this disc, each one based around electronic sequenced rhythms. The LP kicks off with “Look Nicely,” a five-minute instrumental with a pulsating electronic rhythm, drums, and electronics that takes over a minute before any semblance of a melody or chords appears. The next track “Hot Slides!” has a New Wave feel that flirts with Krautrock. The remaining tracks on Side One are similar and dip into Young Marble Giants territory, 60s psych guitar, and some urban-sounding Euro music. When you flip over to Side Two, the music vastly improves. These five tracks channel Harmonia and Neu! The rhythms are slow and motorik, the chords ebb and flow, and the guitar work is outstanding. Each song is different, but linked by these common elements. The final track, “Sleepless and Beatless” has a bubbly bass line and a middle Eastern influenced melody. So think of Pilz, Ohr, and Brain and tune in and drop the needle in the groove, you won’t be disappointed.


Filed under: New releases, 2015 releases

Related artist(s): Moth Effect

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