Exposé Online banner

Markus Reuter — Falling for Ascension
(7d Media , 2017, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2017-06-10

Falling for Ascension Cover art

It’s beginning to look like a reviewer could make a full-time job of just writing about the music Markus Reuter releases. Even taking into consideration that many of them are live improvisations like Centrozoon, there’s a lot of them. This particular one is a bit of a different beast than other recent releases. The music is based on somewhat minimalistic patterns on different instruments that are fit together and repeated with different permutations, a technique that was pioneered in rock music by the 80s incarnation of King Crimson. Reuter’s take on it here ventures into more esoteric territory than Crimson ever did, without any concessions to song forms (and certainly no vocal parts). To manifest this vision, he’s enlisted the Swiss band Sonar, and if you’ve heard their minimalist rock, it’s immediately apparent that they are the perfect collaborators for the project. But when playing Reuter’s compositions, they stray from their obsession with C and F#, giving this music much more harmonic variety than their own recordings. Combine this with the composer’s own playing and production, and this is a very satisfying work of art. I suppose that, given the generally understated nature of the music, it could function in an ambient role, and given the lack of hummable melodies, might come off as lacking substance or emotional engagement for some listeners. To some extent, it seems like an intellectual exercise, but for someone who goes in for that sort of thing, it is a gem. And to be fair, there are elements of human expression involved, mainly in some parts that might be called solos (almost certainly Reuter’s own playing) which have a vaguely Frippian tinge and tone. Falling for Ascension is a bit like a halfway point between Stick Men and Todmorden 513 – I’m not going to say it’s for everyone, but it definitely gets my synapses firing.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): Markus Reuter, Sonar

Latest news

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more

2017-04-16
Allan Holdsworth RIP – Surely in the list of artists who have contributed to the sound of modern music, there is a special spot for guitarist Allan Holdsworth. His name is known to virtually every student of the instrument in jazz and rock, and his style has been so widely emulated that it's hardly worth mentioning anymore — we can just assume that every guitarist has Holdsworth as an influence. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Talking Heads - 2006 Rhino Reissues – Now that CBGB's has finally closed its doors in New York City, it's a good time to explore the reissued back catalog of one of the few valid early inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame....  (2007) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues