Exposé Online banner

Marathon — Sublime Dreams
(Music Is Intelligence WMMS 058, 1994, CD)

by Mike Grimes, Published 1995-11-01

Sublime Dreams Cover art

Why do they do that? I hate that! On Sublime Dreams, Marathon commits the cardinal sin of having vocals in a language that they don't quite have in their grasp. The lyrics appear to have been completely composed in another language then translated, word for word, into English. The whole subject / verb agreement thing is out the window. Tenses.. what are they? Listening to these lyrics is another ordeal. It becomes so annoying that it's unbearable after about one song. It's really unfortunate, because his voice is not all that bad. He reminds me a little of Peter Gabriel in places, but with slightly more power. However, his faulty pronunciations and grammatically indecipherable lyrics prevent me from appreciating anything he sings on the album. They should have hired a translator and English coach if they wanted English vocals that badly. By the way, what's wrong with Italian, guys?

Anyway, what about the music? If you can get past or (in my case) ignore the lyrics, there is some enticing music to be heard. The guitars are a mix of metal, heavy metal, and shred metal. Feedback, harmonics, and dive-bombs are used in almost every song, and any note that is held longer than half a second is pitch bent with the whammy bar. It's kind of like an espresso version of Randy Rhoads – so much so that it's humorous. Even though it's amusing sometimes, the guitar does have some really cool parts. One of the most distinctive aspects of the music is the effective use of sudden changes between major and minor keys – occasionally twice within one measure. Rarely have I heard this technique used in such a clever way. The drums have exaggerated and overdone effects processing which occasionally takes away from the parts played by the other instruments. If it wasn't for the lacking vocals and lyrics, the album would be a decent prog metal album.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 8, 1994 releases

Related artist(s): Marathon

Latest news

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

The Oliver Wakeman Band - Coming to Town: Live in Katowice – Yes fans are probably aware that Rick Wakeman’s son Oliver has been playing keyboards on their recent tour, and for those curious to see what his own band looks and sounds like here’s your chance....  (2009) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues