Exposé Online banner

Magnetic Sound Machine — Plays The Snow Goose
(Lizard CD 0101, 2013, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2015-03-30

Plays The Snow Goose Cover artMost fans of progressive rock are well aware of Camel’s 1975 release The Snow Goose — it’s safe to say it’s widely beloved and considered a classic. Most of those who love that album are aware that it was inspired by a Paul Gallilco novella, though probably far fewer have actually read that novella. Here’s a great idea: a public library presents a reading of the novella backed by Camel’s music. Kids should go for it, especially kids dragged there by parents who are prog rock fans. All well and good, and probably an entertaining experience even for the adults — after all, they get to hear some music they like while the little ones hear the story. Now imagine a recording of this performance, with the music played note-for-note by a live band, the only variation being the timing necessitated by leaving room for the narrator. Probably less enjoyable — the kids aren’t likely to sit still listening to the audio recording, and the parents now find the music interrupted by talking. Now translate the narration into Italian. You’ve eliminated all non-Italian-speakers from the potential audience. Many prog fans don’t mind listening to singing in foreign languages, but extensive narration is a lot harder to take. All of which begs the question: why does this recording exist? The musicians merely duplicate Camel’s original music, adding nothing of their own worth noting. Apparently, you had to be there — and understand Italian.

Filed under: New releases, 2013 releases

Related artist(s): Camel, Magnetic Sound Machine

Latest news

2018-04-05
OBEY Convention XI Set for May 24-28 in Halifax – As the 2018 festival season rapidly approaches, we’d like you to be aware of a real treasure of diverse and creative music that’s going to take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia, next month. The OBEY Convention is on its 11th outing, and features a wide range of artists from around the world. From avant-industrial noise to experimental takes on Classical Chinese music, from chamber jazz to doom metal, from ambient soundscapes to Canadian First Nations drumming, you’d be hard pressed to find a festival with more variety in sound anywhere in the world. » Read more

2018-04-04
Close to the Rain Festival in Bergen Announces Lineup – Now in its second year, the Close to the Rain Festival of progressive music is scheduled to take place in Bergen, Norway, on June 7 - 9. They've got an amazing slate of bands lined up, including such powerhouses as Anekdoten, Major Parkinson, Arabs in Aspic, Tusmørke, and many more. » Read more

2018-03-01
Seaprog 2018 Artist Announcements Raise Festival's Profile – Seattle's Seaprog festival has been going since 2013, and the 2018 edition features a slate of artists that's sure to bring more attention to the event. Cheer-Accident, Bubblemath, and Free Salamander Exhibit are in the first round announcement of performers. In keeping with their tradition of focusing on regional artists, they will also present a number of artists from Washington and Oregon. [Edit: Just added: Inner Ear Brigade] » Read more

2018-02-26
Adelbert von Deyen RIP – Word reaches us that German electronic musician Adelbert von Deyen has died. His recorded legacy reaches back to 1978, when Sky Records released Sternzeit. Von Deyen, who was born October 25, 1953 in Süderbrarup, was also known as a painter and graphic artist. » Read more

2018-02-18
Didier Lockwood RIP – Word reaches us today of the death of one of France's great jazz musicians, violinist Didier Lockwood. His playing bridged many worlds, from traditional jazz to fusion to progressive rock, and his talent can be heard on recordings by Magma, Clearlight, Pierre Moerlen's Gong, and many more. Lockwood was 62. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Copernicus - Disappearance – If Van Halen’s David Lee Roth decided to drop it all and become an obtuse beat poet, that may create a small avenue of interest into the ramblings of Copernicus. There is no doubt that plenty of...  (2010) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues