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Level Pi — Electronic Sheep
(Musea DR 8464, 2009, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2011-06-01

Electronic Sheep Cover artElectronic Sheep is Uwe Cremer’s (aka Level ∏) second release and though firmly rooted in the Teutonic and Berlin-school of electronics, it is quite a departure from Entrance. Gone are the Krautrock references, instead Uwe has created an electronic paean to his heroes Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream, and Jean Michel Jarre. Each of the seven tracks evokes a different mood. The opening track ("String Theorie") is Uwe’s alchemical combination of Schulze, Tangerine Dream, and Jarre with string patches, electronic washes, and slowly evolving chords. The second track ("S.E.T.I.") is a cold sterile piece evoking signals from deep space mixed in with radio snippets, sci-fi sound bites, and sizzling white noise. The third track ("Elfenstaub") is a light and airy piece worthy of Jarre himself. Track four is Uwe’s electronic interpretation of a dishwasher that starts out abstract and becomes a killer piece of Krautrock. The next track ("Traumphase") is a beautiful dreamy voyage preparing you for “Theta Null,” a Tangerine Dream inspired track that perhaps out-Froeses even Edgar himself. The disc closes with "Sonnenwind," another Tangerine Dream inspired piece featuring Uwe’s excellent electric guitar work. Uwe has somehow been able to channel his heroes without sounding derivative. Electronic Sheep is an excellent release and taken with Entrance, you have an amazing collection of diverse music that encapsulates German progressive music from the 70s and 80s and brings it into the new millennium with fresh ideas. Uwe Cremer is an artist to watch and I eagerly await his next release.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 39, 2009 releases

Related artist(s): Level ∏ (Uwe Cremer)

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