Exposé Online banner

Lapis Lazuli — Extended Play
((Not on label) no#, 2012, CD)

Lapis Lazuli — Reality Is
((Not on label) no#, 2012, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2013-07-17

Extended Play Cover artReality Is Cover artThis British sextet is a hard act to nail down. Just when you think you know where thy are going, there’s a completely unpredicted twist in the plot and they go off in another direction, leaving you scratching your head. These are the band’s debut releases – they had so much material recorded that they released both of these simultaneously. Extended Play is not an EP, in fact with four songs clocking in at 68 minutes total, it’s the longer of the two, while the companion release Reality Is contains five cuts at just over an hour. With a style that’s pretty much all over the map, one can hear elements of jazz, funk, prog rock, and all points in between, flavored with varied doses of jam-band, neo-psych, post-rock, Euro-folk, klezmer, Caribbean, Afrobeat, and a whole lot more, all coming together in an interesting and potent collision that defies any convenient descriptives or comparisons. The band features two guitarists, a bassist and a drummer, plus one member who plays sax and doubles on accordion, and a sixth member who handles vocals and covers trumpet, keyboards, congas, timbales and other exotic percussion. Theirs is mainly an all-instrumental attack, with vocals playing a very minor role in the sound overall (and pretty much confined to Extended Play). At times they might seem to be treading on the fringes of chaos, much like Starless period Crimson might do, but they are definitely in control and driving it hard, with lengthy wandering compositional epics and an abundance of adventurous rhythmic textures to be found everywhere. There’s plenty of compelling music here to hold the open-minded listener’s interest and imagination.

Filed under: New releases, 2012 releases

Related artist(s): Lapis Lazuli

More info
http://www.lapislazuliband.co.uk

Latest news

2018-09-05
Krautrock Documentary Seeks Funding – The next installment of the Progressive Warriors documentary series will focus on the vast body of music that falls under the banner of "krautrock." As most of our readers will know, previous films have tackled RIO and the Canterbury scene, as well as what we might call "mainstream" prog rock. » Read more

2018-07-31
Tomasz Stańko RIP – Tomasz Stańko, one of the greats of Eastern European jazz, has died at the age of 76. Stańko's career started in Krzysztof Komeda's quintet, where he contributed trumpet from 1963-1967, when he formed his own group. He worked extensively with Edward Vesala, Don Cherry, Zbigniew Seifert, Chico Freeman, Howard Johnson, Cecil Taylor, and many others. Many of his recordings have been released by ECM, an association that began in the mid-70s. » Read more

2018-07-09
Soft Machine Set to Release New Music – It's been 50 years since The Soft Machine changed the face of music with their first album. Their blend of psychedelic rock and jazz was unique, and while the band went through many changes before disbanding in 1981 — by which time there were no original members remaining — they remained an innovative force with a style all their own. » Read more

2018-07-01
7d Surfaces Happy Rhodes Back Catalog – We've covered singer Happy Rhodes before, both for her solo work and recently with The Security Project, but her 11 albums have been hard to track down. Until now. 7d features high-quality downloads of all her releases, and several of them are also available on CD. » Read more

2018-06-25
Fred Chalenor RIP – We have news of another sad passing in the world of creative music. Bassist Fred Chalenor, whose creativity featured on albums by Tone Dogs, Caveman Shoestore, and many more, died on June 23, 2018 after a long battle with Alzheimer's. Tributes have poured in from the many musicians and fans whose lives he touched. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Thriving Ivory - Thriving Ivory – It’s been quite sometime since a solo pianist was credited as an alternative rock band’s key instrument replacing loud, overdriven guitars. Such is the case for Thriving Ivory is a five-piece...  (2004) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues