Exposé Online banner

Lacrymosa — Joy of the Wrecked Ship
(4033, 1994, CD)

by Mike McLatchey, Published 1994-08-01

Joy of the Wrecked Ship Cover art

It’s been quite a long time since S. Chihiro (flip through an issue of Marquee, he's the one with the bass and the weird helmets) and company have released a full album – about ten years. Yes, there was the reissue of their "Gishin-Anki" single on the Lost Years in a Labyrinth compilation a couple years back, but Chihiro has been quiet musically for the last few years, occasionally writing for Marquee. So here's a new album in the 70 minute realm of rather short compositions made to flow as a whole and in the familiar Lacrymosa style. Lacrymosa, like the Japanese group Katra Turana, were very much influenced by Atem stable – you know groups like Art Zoyd, Present, and Univers Zero or those related like Nazca. Easily you should be able to get an idea of whether or not you'll finish this review! While the jagged neo classical chamber rock musings are certainly here, Lacrymosa mix a good dose of Eastern influence into the music similar in many ways to the first album (aka Bugbear). The difference here is maturity. The instrumentation is very diverse, rarely does one track sound like another. The chromatic stylings typical to the bands related above isn't everywhere - sometimes there are much more melodic tracks with female vocals and traditional instrumentation. Obviously there is a lot of classical music in here like Bartók, Stravinsky, Dvořák, or even Satie at its most whimsical moments. For seventy minutes there's an awful lot going on to be able to absorb it all in a few listens, but the more I listen to it the more I like it. It is obviously all well thought out and professionally executed and overall rather original. Well done.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 4, 1994 releases

Related artist(s): Lacrymosa

Latest news

2017-02-20
Larry Coryell RIP – One of the greats of jazz guitar has left us at the age of 73. Larry Coryell was one of the founding figures of jazz fusion, but produced a significant body of work the bridged many styles. His group Eleventh House provided a unique take on the combination of jazz and rock that was distinct from contemporaries such as Mahavishnu Orchestra, Return to Forever, and Weather Report. » Read more

2017-01-31
John Wetton RIP – After a long battle with colon cancer, singer and bassist John Wetton has died at the age of 67. As an integral member of such bands as King Crimson, UK, and Asia, his was one of the distinctive voices in progressive rock, lending a human touch to often difficult music. » Read more

2017-01-30
Seaprog Announces First Artists for 2017 – The organizers of the Seaprog Festival in Seattle have announced the first set of confirmed performers for the 2017 festival. The best known names are Jack o' the Clock and Zero Times Everything, but a host of other bands are featured, mostly from the Northwest. The festival will take place June 2-4, 2017. » Read more

2017-01-27
Acoustic Festival of Britain 2017 Announces Eclectic Lineup – The Acoustic Festival of Britain has been going since 2006, and this year's event sees a number of outstanding artists on the bill. Fairport Convention, Tir na nOg, and Martin Turner are some of the artists we've covered, and there are many more, including The Men They Couldn't Hang, Howard Jones, Chantel McGregor, and many more. The festival runs June 2-4, 2017 at Uttoxeter Racecourse in Staffordshire. » Read more

2017-01-26
Butch Trucks RIP – Butch Trucks was one of two drummers in the first incarnation of the Allman Brothers Band in 1969, helping the band achieve its legendary status as an American original. He died on January 24, 2017 of a self-inflicted gunshot would. He was 69. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

John Tavener - Eternity's Sunrise – The British composer John Tavener has struck a chord with a significant cross-over audience. Like Arvo Pärt, Tavener creates a sumptuously gorgeous music infused with his belief in God and a...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues