Exposé Online banner

Kingston Wall — Kingston Wall
(Zen Garden GAR 16, 1992/1998, CD)

Kingston Wall — II
(Zen Garden GAR 17, 1993/1998, CD)

Kingston Wall — III: Tri-Logy
(Zen Garden GAR 18, 1994/1998, CD)

by Mike McLatchey, Published 1995-11-01

Kingston Wall Cover artII Cover artIII: Tri-Logy Cover art

Kingston Wall is a Finnish power trio who seem to operate outside the normal "progressive rock" distributors, yet would certainly be a crossover group of great potential. While the band has been around for quite sometime, they have only recently come to the attention of the general prog-rock audience. The group is a trio of exceptional talent led by guitarist / vocalist Petri Walli. Walli's guitar playing and ideas seem to be a cross between psychedelic rock from the 60s and 70s and a modern rock somewhat in the Seattle / grunge area without being musically banal (well not too often anyway). Walli is backed by the thunderous rhythm section of bassist Jukka Jylli and drummer Sami Kuopamakki who are talented enough to never let the music verge one dimensional. They make quite a sound for a trio yet are often augmented by synths and even didgeridoo at times.

The band wouldn't have made much of a fuss with their debut. Kingston Wall is more or less a collection of hard rock songs. I hear Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and some of the NWOBHM stuff like Iron Maiden, Ozzy etc.; on to more modern influences – Faith No More, Jane's Addiction, and as said before a little grunge. It's obvious Walli's guitar playing was heavily influenced by Hendrix and Jimmy Page; there's even an energetic cover of "Fire" here. It's not until the long 21 minute "Mushrooms" that you begin to hear the future of this group – the hints towards psychedelics and more unusual ethnic elements.

Kingston Wall's second was a much more inventive affair. The band's music is certainly more expressive here, with Walli's guitar playing exploring more exotic and eastern scales similar in ways to Ozric Tentacles. There are a lot of brilliant instrumentals ("Istwan" to name one) that remind me of early Black Sun Ensemble or a fuller Tangle Edge. The sound seems to have taken on a more ethnic bent, and there are a lot of psychedelic and new age references as well. While there are a few duff tracks – basically dull rock songs with annoying vocals – most of this is fantastic music, well worthy of the attention of Ozric and Hendrix fans.

Kingston Wall III "Tri-Logy" is much the same, but some of their obvious excesses seem blown out of proportion here. Lyrically, the band doesn't cut it all – the opener "Another Piece of Cake" is a good indication that their grasp of English is so poor its embarrassing (really we don't mind if you sing in Finnish!). Unfortunately so is their conceptualizing; obviously some sort of new age / holistic / mythology type of idea, the overall effect is that there were far too many psychedelic drugs in the studio. With the over the top packaging (but you gotta love the cover) it almost seems like no substance and lotsa frills. However the music (when the lyrics aren't crowding them out) is quite good and much more spacious than their previous releases. With heavier synth use and some more Middle Eastern ethnic themes, the overall effect is still quite impressive, and definitely recommended to fans of a neo-psych sound. With rumors that the band has broken up, it's hard to say what's next but certainly Kingston Wall has made its mark.


Filed under: Reissues, Issue 8, 1998 releases, 1992 recordings, 1993 recordings, 1994 recordings

Related artist(s): Kingston Wall

Latest news

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Deathwatch Beetle Repairman - Hollow Fishes – Debut albums from obtuse solo acts can be difficult to ascertain on the surface. The first few listens of this disc from the Toronto based artist sound very much like an alternative to some of the...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues