Exposé Online banner

Kevin Kastning — 30/36
(Greydisc GDR 3546, 2018, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2019-01-25

30/36 Cover art

This is Kevin Kastning solo. Alone, sparse, wandering, introspective and meditative, playing either his 30-string contra-alto guitar, or his 36-string double contraguitar. This marks his fifth completely solo effort among 33 solo and collaborations on Greydisc records. Some may wonder why Kastning releases so many discs, but if the ideas are there along with the feeling inside, the muse must be shared, and given that what he produces is so unique, a product of his own soundworld with his numerous custom and completely unusual sounding stringed instruments, there is certainly none other like him. A true original. With 30/36, many of the pieces here are short suites that go through a number of ideas before they conclude; they tend to be a bit longer than most of his compositions, many in the six to ten minute range, evoking a range of different feelings as they wander through a number of phases, much like fragments of dreams with hidden portals that the listener crosses as they find their way to and through the next hidden step. Every piece is somewhat reflective and provides a solitary and peaceful space for the imagination to grow freely. “Bahuya II” begins with a four note descending melody repeated only a few times before it begins to morph and wander into spaces completely unlike where it began, all the time emphasizing the importance of space between notes, allowing the listener openings where the notes in play can be processed. “Wotruba II” follows it, offering a more dense playground over a fully panoramic spectrum, with numerous layers of ever-shifting dynamics and reclusive strands of compelling disonnance. The album closer “Aequus Nox II” is another where silence and spaces are are as powerful as the notes and structures that separate them. All nine tracks on 30/36 taken together make for one powerful and epic mind journey.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Kevin Kastning

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Sheila Chandra with the Ganges Orchestra - "This Sentence Is True" (The Previous Sentence Is False) – Throughout the 90s, Sheila Chandra recorded albums of solo voice, basically drones with refined, studied melodies and tones above them. That was interesting enough (since I love her voice), but lacked...  (2001) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues