Exposé Online banner

Kaukasus — I
(Burning Shed Autumnsongs AR011CD, 2014, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2014-08-13

I Cover artKaukasus is a collaboration between three prominent figures in Scandinavian progressive rock: Ketil Vestrum Einarsen (Jaga Jazzist, Motorpsycho), Rhys Marsh (The Autumn Ghost, Opium Cartel), and Mattias Olsson (Änglagård, White Willow). Given that pedigree, you would be right to expect something special, and their debut album does not disappoint — unless your tastes are very picky or narrow. The modern prog sound you might expect (big guitars, atmospheric production touches, combination of vintage and modern keyboards) are there, but there's a lot more going on. It's with track 3 that things start going sideways. "In the Stillness of Time" starts out with a minimal electronic rhythm part accompanying sparse piano chords and Marsh's powerful singing, then builds into a great rock tune, dripping with Mellotron and fat synth sounds. After about four minutes, it drifts off into quiet ambiance, with distant twittering sounds and indistinct chords. This moves without break into "Starlit Motion," which brings up the synth part (possibly sequences on a VCS3) and introduces Einarsen's flute. We're moving off into some lovely space territory here, the power of the rock band left as a distant memory. "Reptilian" appropriately starts with a quiet section before building back to the rock intensity. It's like the best of Motorpsycho's psych-prog crossed with Änglagård's powerful symphonic prog. It's also a prime example of why the Mellotron has endured in spite of its flaky sound — there's just something about the way that messy string sound fills out an arrangement that can't be explained by nostalgia. You might not expect this trio's combination of symphonic prog and space rock to work, but they pull it off in a big way. This is a supergroup that is more than the sum of its parts, and one of the top progressive rock releases of 2014.

Filed under: New releases, 2014 releases

Related artist(s): Kaukasus, Rhys Marsh

Latest news

2020-07-22
Tim Smith RIP – Tim Smith, leader of the eccentric band Cardiacs, has died at the ago of 59 after many years of health problems. Cardiacs was known for intense and complicated music that combined punk energy with the rhythmic and harmonic sophistication of progressive rock. » Read more

2020-07-12
Judy Dyble RIP – Singer-songwriter Judy Dyble, who was a founding member of Fairport Convention and one of the distinctive voices of the 60s folk revival in Britain, has died at the age of 71. Her passing came at the end of a long illness, though which she continued to work. » Read more

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Ash Ra Tempel - Le Berceau de Cristal – Remember Tangerine Dream's Green Desert? Many a time have I discussed its legitimacy as a long lost album with people. Hailing from 1985, yet claiming to be from 1973, it just didn't seem to...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues