Exposé Online banner

Kaipa — Inget Nytt Under Solen
(Musea FGBG 4098AR, 1976/1994, CD)

Kaipa — Kaipa
(Musea FGBG 4091AR, 1975/1993, CD)

Kaipa — Stockholm Symphonie
(*, 1976/1993, CD)

by Henry Schneider, 1993-12-31:

Inget Nytt Under Solen Cover artKaipa  Cover artStockholm Symphonie Cover art Here we have another CD in a long line of excellent Musea progressive rock reissues. Kaipa was a Swedish band that released their self-titled debut album in 1975. Kaipa, the album, by mid-seventies standards contains music full of youthful exuberance while finding its roots in both classical and Swedish folk music. Kaipa, the band, rivaled their Anglo-Saxon contemporaries Camel. Their dual lead guitars are reminiscent of Camel’s album Mirage. At other times Kaipa, the album, reminded me of efforts by other Scandinavian musicians such as Pluto and Pekka Pohjola. Kaipa, the album, grew on me. I found myself humming snatches of the songs hours later. Though singing in Swedish, Hans Lundin’s voice is a pleasure to experience. His rich falsetto does not have that annoying shrillness of Jon Anderson’s. The many Hammond organ riffs and the essentially instrumental songs beautifully combine classical music, popular folk melodies, and the best of English and Italian progressive rock. The outstanding track on the CD is the final song "Oceaner Föder Liv," a 9:29 extravaganza brimming with exquisite harpsichord solos, thunderstorms, weird voices, and gorgeous melodies. Though not the best progressive band or album of the seventies, Kaipa, the album, is an essential CD for the progressive rock fan. Musea should be applauded for bringing this long lost album to a new audience.

by Mike McLatchey, 1994-05-01:

In their early years, the Swedish band Kaipa were a quartet playing music in the symphonic rock vein as typified by Yes or Genesis. Vocalist/Keyboardist Hans Ludin is nearly a dead ringer for a Swedish Jon Anderson, and this comparison may have affected the band's quest for international acclaim, being that their debut was released in 1975 and that progressive rock bands were not in vogue with the big labels by this time (regardless of the fact that they were on Decca in Sweden). Their debut is a fine album, showing Kaipa in their early stages. Guitarist Roine Stolt is an immediate standout and proves to be a unique element — his Allman Brothers/Santana influenced playing is a breath of fresh air for this type of music. All of the melodies, many taken from traditional Swedish folk, seem to be worked out and many are quite excellent and accessible. Not quite a classic (I tend to like a little more pyrotechnics) but a definite winner for the symphonic fan.

Inget... is a more mature work with a greater palate of keyboard sounds (including Mellotron). There is a side-long suite and drummer Ingemar Bergman adds some harsh vocals somewhere in the middle of it than can be off-putting to the uninitiated. The album is more mature than its predecessor, and the title cut that ends the album is a beauty and probably most indicative of their style, dreamy symphonic rock with simple yet very effective melodies and a great deal of emotion. Probably the best of their studio albums, this reissue includes several bonus tracks — a short live version of the side-long track (see below), and rather dull English vocal versions of the same mixes with a singer that reminds one of Gabriel or Lanzetti of PFM. Overall, an excellent purchase.

Stockholm Symphonie to say the least, has been a bitch to locate. A very limited Japanese pressing, this is a brilliant live radio show from between their first two albums, with most of the songs coming from their debut. Kaipa come across more effectively live (the bonus track on Inget... also is a good example of this) with a more insistent and intense delivery with greater room given to Stolt's excellent guitar work. Being that this may be impossible to find, it would be best to go for one of the first two, but believe me, Kaipa were a super live band and this may be my favorite of the three.

With the rejuvenation of the Swedish symphonic scene, this is an ideal time for the reissues of possibly one of their most influential bands. Recommended.


Filed under: Reissues , Issue 3 , 1994 releases, 1976 releases, 1993 releases, 1975 releases, 1993 releases, 1976 releases

Related artist(s): Kaipa

More info

Latest news

2018-05-14
Glenn Branca RIP – Experimental guitarist and composer Glenn Branca has died at the age of 69. He was known for compositions featuring large ensembles of guitars, and for the use of feedback. He founded his band Theoretical Girls in the mid-70s as an art-punk answer to what he saw as the increasing commercialization of punk music. His compositions were highly influential, with such figures as David Bowie, Thurston Moore, and John Lurie among his fans. » Read more

2018-04-05
OBEY Convention XI Set for May 24-28 in Halifax – As the 2018 festival season rapidly approaches, we’d like you to be aware of a real treasure of diverse and creative music that’s going to take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia, next month. The OBEY Convention is on its 11th outing, and features a wide range of artists from around the world. From avant-industrial noise to experimental takes on Classical Chinese music, from chamber jazz to doom metal, from ambient soundscapes to Canadian First Nations drumming, you’d be hard pressed to find a festival with more variety in sound anywhere in the world. » Read more

2018-04-04
Close to the Rain Festival in Bergen Announces Lineup – Now in its second year, the Close to the Rain Festival of progressive music is scheduled to take place in Bergen, Norway, on June 7 - 9. They've got an amazing slate of bands lined up, including such powerhouses as Anekdoten, Major Parkinson, Arabs in Aspic, Tusmørke, and many more. » Read more

2018-03-01
Seaprog 2018 Artist Announcements Raise Festival's Profile – Seattle's Seaprog festival has been going since 2013, and the 2018 edition features a slate of artists that's sure to bring more attention to the event. Cheer-Accident, Bubblemath, and Free Salamander Exhibit are in the first round announcement of performers. In keeping with their tradition of focusing on regional artists, they will also present a number of artists from Washington and Oregon. [Edit: Just added: Inner Ear Brigade] » Read more

2018-02-26
Adelbert von Deyen RIP – Word reaches us that German electronic musician Adelbert von Deyen has died. His recorded legacy reaches back to 1978, when Sky Records released Sternzeit. Von Deyen, who was born October 25, 1953 in Süderbrarup, was also known as a painter and graphic artist. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Praise Space Electric - Mushroom Jazz – This is progressive rock with a groove. The title Mushroom Jazz is actually a pretty apt name, as this is not too stylistically far away from Acid Jazz. Weird analog synth sounds, funky bass and...  (1999) » Read more

Steve Tibbetts - The Fall of Us All – Steve is back with his first solo offering since 1990's Big Map Idea. For the uninitiated, this Minnesota guitarist's music is truly in a league of its own, anything from a swirling maelstrom of...  (1994) » Read more

Various Artists - Psychedelic Underground 11 - 15 – Beginning with its first year of operations, Garden of Delights has released a yearly limited edition Psychedelic Underground sampler containing the best track from each of their 9 reissues for that...  (2011) » Read more

Goma - 14 Abril – Goma was a five piece in the grand Spanish tradition, mixing a hard rock sound with elements of folk, in many ways similar to bands like Triana and Bloque, but Goma came several years earlier, and...  (1996) » Read more

Sagittarian - Sagittarian – Sagittarian were a Japanese primarily-instrumental six-piece that put out one obscure album in the early 80s (in a limited edition of 100). The dominant sound is a Camel-influenced progressive rock,...  (1996) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues