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Jeremy Cubert Project — From A to B
(Psycho-Audible PA-0003, 2000, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2001-07-01

From A to B Cover art

Back in Exposé #18, I reviewed the first Psycho-Audible release, Alpha Centauri by Zapotec. This Psycho-Audible disc features the same key players: guitarist Bill Curtis, violinist Anna Hubbell, and keyboardist Jeremy Cubert. But this time the spotlight is on Cubert, composer of all tracks (three in collaboration with others). Acoustic piano is by far Cubert’s preferred instrument on this set, though he uses a wide array of synthesizers (both analog and digital, by the sound of it) as well as a bit of Chapman Stick. The overall style is similar to Zapotec, walking a middle ground between jazz fusion and progressive rock, sort of Return to Forever meets Happy the Man. The Happy the Man similarity I noticed with the earlier band is more blatant here, to the point of including a track called “Happy the Fan.” Cubert’s piano playing is deft without sounding over-rehearsed, having a spontaneous quality even in what must be composed sections, and full of nice touches. Several tracks are basically piano solos with some acoustic guitar, a little like a Chick Corea-Larry Coryell duet might have sounded in 1975. Bill Curtis provides most of the flashier solo moments, using a wide variety of techniques to add a bit of grit to Cubert’s polished compositions. My favorite parts of From A to B are the more energetic, aggressive sections, like “On the Edge,” with its insistent triplet pulse and surging melody, the heavy Emerson-esque organ of “Go!” or the brief burst of chaos that is “Stop!” My only real complaint about this CD is that many of the pieces (in the two to four minute range) wrap up too quickly, ending or fading out where a little more development would be welcome.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 22, 2000 releases

Related artist(s): Jeremy Cubert

More info
http://jeremycubert.bandcamp.com/album/from-a-to-b

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