Exposé Online banner

Ingranaggi della Valle — Warm Spaced Blue
(Black Widow BWRCD 191-2, 2016, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-02-18

Warm Spaced Blue Cover art

Warm Spaced Blue is the second release by Ingranaggi della Valle. Whereas their 2013 debut release In Hoc Signo had its roots in 70s Italian prog, the band decided to go in an entirely different direction with Warm Spaced Blue. The whole tone of the album is quite dark with obvious references to HP Lovecraft’s Chtulhu Mythos. The band used a different compositional method from their debut by letting the music dominate over the instruments, with each band member contributing. Each of the six compositions has a similar shape with an intro, crescendos, diminuendos, quiet interludes, and energetic passages that revolve around central themes. Even though there are intermittent short vocal passages, each track is essentially an instrumental played on a wide range of instruments from Mellotrons, Moogs, Hammond organ, guitars, flute, glockenspiel, and violin to Roland drum machines, Akai MPC, and Kaoss Pad. Ingranaggi della Valle integrate the gothic horror of the gibbering and slathering chaotic minions in Chtulhu's underwater city R’lyeh with progressive jazz rock fusion, chamber rock, and a hint of Frippian King Crimson chord progressions and dissonance. Each composition goes through so many changes that you won’t lose interest. Three of the tracks are different movements for “Call of Chtulhu,” that sets the tone. The other tracks are “Inntal,” an Alpine valley in Switzerland; “Lada Niva,” the Russian SUV; and “Ayida Wedo,” voodoo’s rainbow serpent. An intriguing range of topics that I find challenging to connect with the music. It is refreshing to see young band take a risk with a new direction and not be afraid to explore a different genre after a successful first release.


Filed under: New releases, 2016 releases

Related artist(s): Ingranaggi della Valle

Latest news

2020-02-18
Jon Christensen RIP – Word reaches us today of the passing of Norwegian drummer Jon Christensen, a musician whose sensitive playing did much to help define the atmospheric sound of ECM jazz recordings. His work with Jan Garbarek, Bobo Stenson, Terje Rypdal, and many more was sensitive and varied, adapting to a wide variety of styles while maintaining a distinct identity of its own. Christensen was 76. » Read more

2020-01-21
Gong Announces UK Tour for 2020 – Having spent the last few years touring the world, including dates in Japan with psych legend Steve Hillage, multiple headline European tours and festivals, America’s Cruise to the Edge festival, a South America headline tour, and a headline performance at Tomorrow Festival in China, the band have won the hearts of both traditional and modern Gong fanbases. During this live journey, Gong has delved further into the truly psychedelic, exploratory, and mind-expanding side of the music. » Read more

2020-01-15
Carlos Alvarado RIP – Carlos Alvarado, pioneering composer, multi-instrumentalist and pioneer of progressive rock and electronic experimental music in Mexico, passed away January 14th, 2020 at age 68 after a two year battle with cancer.  » Read more

2020-01-12
Wolfgang Dauner RIP – Pianist Wolfgang Dauner, one of the pioneers of both European free jazz and jazz rock, has died at the age of 84. With his own groups and with the United Jazz+Rock Ensemble, his playing and compositions were a prominent presence in European jazz from the mid-60s until just recently. » Read more

2020-01-12
Michael Allison RIP – Michael Allison, who since 1997 has been recording as Darshan Ambient, passed away on January 9th after a long and brave battle with cancer. He has been at at the forefront of the new ambient/electronic music scene, with over eighteen releases to his credit. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Three Shanghai Bands – These three bands hail from Shanghai, a city known for avant-garde music, and they certainly fit that categorization; they share members, several of whom have also worked in other prominent Shanghai...  (2011) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues