Exposé Online banner

Indrek Patte — Celebration
(Strangiato Records 2005, 2011, CD)

by Peter Thelen, 2013-04-01:

Celebration Cover art Patte is an Estonian composer, multi-instrumentalist and singer, and a veteran of several bands – the only one of which this writer is familiar with is Ruja. Here he delivers eight superbly arranged tracks in the classic progressive rock vein, handling vocals, 12-string guitar, keyboards, percussion and drum programming, with a number of other musicians supporting on bass, guitars, flute, strings, and saxes. Patte's voice is powerful, and a little on the rough side, not unlike Peter Gabriel on his early solo albums. As far as his compositions and arrangements go, there are frequent reminders of the styles of mid-period Genesis (the song "Learn to Live" is hauntingly similar to "A Trick of the Tail"), mid-period Gentle Giant, and to a lesser degree Yes, early Marillion, plus, as the disc progresses, we hear some prog-metal influences come to the fore. Okay, this may sound like I'm ripping it for lack of originality, which is certainly not the case at all. In fact there are plenty of well-executed ideas throughout this disc that are nothing short of exceptional, and the production is surprisingly good. But it does fit nicely within those stylistic boundaries, much like Spock's Beard's early work, Flower Kings and any of a number of other contemporary prog bands. Which, in summary means that many readers are going to find plenty herein to enjoy.

by Paul Hightower, 2014-01-17:

If you ever need to know who produced progressive rock’s archetypal music just listen to the many musicians openly using them as a template. Estonian musician Indrek Patte is a case in point. It took me 30 seconds into the opener “Resurrection” to spot the “Firth of Fifth” references. Likewise with “Learn to Live” (“A Trick of the Tail”), “One Way” (Gentle Giant), “Shine” (Yes), “Celebration” (Steve Hackett), etc. “Mount Meggido” — a sort of Deep Purple/Dream Theatre mashup — keeps its references buried deep enough below the 80s stadium rock sound infusing most of the record that it wasn’t such a distraction. I don’t mind a good homage (IQ’s “Harvest of Souls” for example) but Patte needs to learn how to distinguish between capturing the spirit of a song as opposed to merely mimicking the sounds and songwriting. Even though his name is on it, this is really a band project with Patte (vocals, keys, 12-string, drum programming) augmented by guest guitarists, bassists, and even some strings and sax. As a result Celebration is very full-bodied and robust album, with a nice spread across the sound spectrum. I can’t comment on the English lyrics, which are heavily Christian in nature (even on the hair-metal homage “You Stay with Me”), but Patte might want to consider hiring a singer for any future endeavors as his own singing suffers from a husky rasp and heavy accent. He clearly put a lot of work into this album. Now Patte just needs to find his own voice.

Filed under: New releases , 2011 releases

Related artist(s): Indrek Patte

More info

Latest news

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Sándor Szabó & Kevin Kastning - Returning – For readers who have memorized every review this magazine has published, I won't have to remind you that we've covered the two previous releases by this duo of unusual guitarists. For the rest of our...  (2011) » Read more

Tim Bowness / Samuel Smiles - World of Bright Futures – Vocalist Tim Bowness (of No-Man) formed Samuel Smiles back in the early 1990s with Michael Bearpark (guitar, programming) as an exercise in “ambient folk” music. For this, their first...  (2000) » Read more

Mani Neumeier - Sketches – When you hear the name Mani Neumeier you think of his body of work with Guru Guru and his zaniness in concert. In addition, when you hear that he has released his first solo album, Sketches, which he...  (2008) » Read more

The New St. George - High Tea – The New St. George is a five-piece folk rock outfit from the Washington, DC area who sport a strong British/Celtic personality and two excellent vocalists. Their music may remind of the likes of...  (1995) » Read more

Soft Boys - Nextdoorland – I don’t think I would get much argument if I claimed that the Soft Boys were, in their original incarnation (1976-1981) the prime exponents of psychedelic punk music. The sheer lack of...  (2003) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues