Exposé Online banner

Dogma — Twin Sunrise
(Progressive Rock Worldwide PRW 019, 1995, CD)

by Alain Lachapelle, 1995-11-01:

Twin Sunrise Cover art

This brand new album by Brazilian band Dogma showcases a wider instrumentation in which Fernando Campos' acoustic guitar brings on many delicate moments, alongside compositions that are making more place for emotional expressions. The addition of a string section, flute, a choir, and actual vocals on two tracks personalizes this largely instrumental music played by a standard combo of guitars, keyboards, bass, and drums. Still rooted in the melodic domain, it rises above standard fare with the help of a steady, if not downright sober, approach that highlights the expressive content of the material being presented on this follow-up to their debut Album. At times very melodic in the neo sense, it still keeps a fresh attitude, giving in melodies just enough to underline a motif, retaining globally a clear perspective of progression. The atmosphere of most musical ideas have time to develop into their own lives, even in shorter pieces. What's new, when compared to their first disc, is the evolution of the compositional level, now making a larger place for an intuitive delicacy that shrouds the arrangements. If you have liked Dogma's first offering you'll savor this new one on the basis of an expanding expressive component.


by Mike Ohman, 1997-02-01:

Dogma are certainly given ample help on their sophomore release: strings, a choir, a flute player and four vocalists appear this time round. Don't let the vocalists scare you. Well, not too much, anyway. Only two tracks feature vocals of any consequence (unless you count the one with the choir, and even that's nothing to be frightened of; it's completely devoid of that horrid Mormon Tabernacle quality most choirs exude from their very pores), and only one of them ("The Place") has that annoying "wanna have a hit-single" quality. Despite that one track, the band have grown by leaps and bounds since Album. Fernando Campos' guitar playing has grown more confident, Renato Coutinho's keyboard voicings more original and vital. This coupled with an improved compositional ability and the band's already impressive rhythm section, makes the rest of the album quite impressive indeed, the two epic tracks "The Landing" and "Twin Sunrise" especially.


Filed under: New releases , Issue 11 , 1995 releases

Related artist(s): Dogma

More info

Latest news

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Steve Roach - Sigh of Ages – Sigh of Ages is Steve Roach's fourth release of 2010. Six continuous tracks totaling 74 minutes take you on a journey that is deep, dark and hypnotic for its duration. You either really like this type...  (2011) » Read more

Drama - Strange Expression – A trio from Erie, Pennsylvania, Drama's music combines three qualities that are seldom found together in the right proportions: hard hitting, high energy progressive rock; an excellent singer; and a...  (1994) » Read more

['ramp] - Doombient.One - Verbrannte Erde – Deep space music has a lot going for it in the modern music world. There are many viable variations to explore and expand on as well. Stephen Parsick and Frank Makowski are composers whom make small...  (2005) » Read more

Christian Vander - Les Voyages de Christoph Colomb – This is not so much a solo album as it is a narrative with some backing music. All of the music is performed by Christian Vander on synthesizers (which were programmed accordingly by Stella Vander)....  (1995) » Read more

Rush - Test for Echo & Working Man Tribute – My initial reaction to the new Rush album: "It's bogus." After making this statement, people claimed that it wasn't informative enough, so I sat back and rethought just what I meant....  (1997) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues