Exposé Online banner

Dog Drive Mantis — How Did We Get Here?
(Bandcamp no#, 2018, CD / DL)

by Jon Davis, Published 2018-09-18

How Did We Get Here? Cover art

From the wilds of Ontario — Mississauga, to be precise — comes this genre-defying band. With elements of math rock, post rock, jazz, and “other” among the references, they present an appealing blend. At their best, as on “Dancing on Symbols,” they get the balance right, with unusual guitar lines (Mike Papaloni) backing melodies on the alto sax (Derek Serbin), while bass (Carmen Haines) and drums (Neilroy Miranda) navigate interesting rhythmic arrangements. “Jungle Girl” is another winner, with dissonant guitar chords and sax lines that seem to be in a different key altogether, though that may be an artifact of the bizarre voicings from the guitar. There are a couple of tracks where they misstep, however, and Serbin’s sax dips into woozy schmaltz, coming off more than a bit corny. This is a tendency inherent to the alto saxophone, which by nature has less grit in its tone than tenor or baritone (soprano can be even worse, but that has nothing to do with Dog Drive Mantis). Their strongest moments are when they throw convention out the window and do something weird, like on “Chief King,” which consists of electronic noises, strange indistinct vocals, and an imaginative drum part. Still, this is a young band, and How Did We Get Here? shows a lot of promise. They have many strengths to build on, and honing their sound should take them far. Actually, Mississauga is home to more than a half million people, very near Toronto, and probably can’t be fairly described as “the wilds of Ontario,” but as far as being a home for creative music, it seems as likely as a fishing village on Hudson Bay. (Any other bands from Mississauga who wish to dispute this are welcome to send me their music.)


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Dog Drive Mantis

More info
http://dogdrivemantis.bandcamp.com/album/how-did-we-get-here

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Agitation Free - Malesch – Agitation Free was a most unique German band in the early seventies, in that their sound was heavily influenced by Turkish and Arabic themes, although never more so than on this, their first, from...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues