Exposé Online banner

Cyrille Verdeaux — Messenger of the Son
(Musea FGBG 4141.AR, 1984/1995, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 1996-03-01

Messenger of the Son Cover artVerdeaux' name should be familiar to many, he was the main mover in the intensely symphonic seventies French band Clearlight, whose first two albums Symphony and Forever Blowing Bubbles are essential listening for any progressive rock fan who has gotten beyond the Yes, Genesis and Marillion phase. After four records (and some side-projects) as Clearlight, Verdeaux began intermittently releasing music under his own name, much of which has been regrettably overlooked. Some, like the six-part Kundalini Opera never even made it past a cassette release. One of the albums that did make its way to LP was Messenger of the Son, but released on the underpowered Catero label, it never got the distribution it deserved. This could easily be thought of as the fifth Clearlight album, as much of the music here fits more into a band sound than a solo project. Indeed many of the players from the previous edition of Clearlight are here: drummer Michel Risse, guitarist Christian Boule, synthesists Jean-Philippe Rykiel and Frederic Rousseau, and so on. Verdeaux' piano and the synths of Rykiel and Rousseau are interwoven to create the trademark wall of keyboards sound that Clearlight is known for. The difference between this and the earlier work is that it tends to be a bit more adventurous and, at least in some parts, more introspective. There are no vocals on the album proper, but the last of the four bonus tracks from his even-more obscure 1988 album Rhapsodies pour le Planete Bleue does, which sums everything up nicely at the end. Musea has done an outstanding job with the sound, but surprisingly has left the booklet (what booklet?) very lean on information. A welcome reissue that deserves far more attention.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 9, 1995 releases, 1984 recordings

Related artist(s): Cyrille Verdeaux

Latest news

2018-09-29
Marty Balin RIP – One of the architects of the 60s psychedelic sound of San Francisco has died at the age of 76. Marty Balin was a singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the founders of Jefferson Airplane. After the split of the original Airplane, Balin went on to form the highly successful Jefferson Starship. » Read more

2018-09-25
Help the Psychic Equalizer Avoid Extinction – Last year we reviewed the debut album by Psychic Equalizer, a musical project of Hugo Selles. He's now working on the ambitious follow-up to that release, and is seeking funding from listeners around the world. » Read more

2018-09-05
Krautrock Documentary Seeks Funding – The next installment of the Progressive Warriors documentary series will focus on the vast body of music that falls under the banner of "krautrock." As most of our readers will know, previous films have tackled RIO and the Canterbury scene, as well as what we might call "mainstream" prog rock. » Read more

2018-07-31
Tomasz Stańko RIP – Tomasz Stańko, one of the greats of Eastern European jazz, has died at the age of 76. Stańko's career started in Krzysztof Komeda's quintet, where he contributed trumpet from 1963-1967, when he formed his own group. He worked extensively with Edward Vesala, Don Cherry, Zbigniew Seifert, Chico Freeman, Howard Johnson, Cecil Taylor, and many others. Many of his recordings have been released by ECM, an association that began in the mid-70s. » Read more

2018-07-09
Soft Machine Set to Release New Music – It's been 50 years since The Soft Machine changed the face of music with their first album. Their blend of psychedelic rock and jazz was unique, and while the band went through many changes before disbanding in 1981 — by which time there were no original members remaining — they remained an innovative force with a style all their own. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Red Jasper - The Winter's Tale – More three-four chord neo-progressive? Have that craving for shrill digital patches and maybe, just maybe another vocalist who got locked in a room full of old Marillion records? Well, not exactly —...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues