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Brother Saturn — Music for Sleep
(We Are All Ghosts Waag 130, 2019, DL)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2019-12-15

Music for Sleep Cover art

If there was ever a perfectly titled album, Brother Saturn’s Music for Sleep is it. Brother Saturn is the musical alias of Colorado based multi-instrumentalist and composer Drew Miller, combining ambient textures, drone, classical elements and post rock music to form his lush and sonic soundscapes. Since 2013, he has released about a dozen recordings of this type, most currently available as downloads only on the We Are All Ghosts label, though Music for Sleep will be the first one to get a physical release, both on vinyl and compact disc on the Symbolic Insight label, in limited editions of 10 and 50 copies respectively. Using guitars and piano in this experimental context (with an abundance of studio processing and effects), the end result ends up sounding like neither, but his aim to create music for slumber is powerful and accurate. The music is like a fabric that slowly morphs slowly as it goes, essentially void of cadence or percussive sounds to lean on, the shifts in texture and tonal color drift slowly in and out and flow and soothe the mind and spirit as the listener becomes completely immersed in the proceedings. Points of tonal color like water droplets or celestial events eclipsing one another, revealing themselves in various ways on many of the seven tracks, but duly blend in with the surrounding textures, seemingly designed to engulf the listener and prepare them for meditation or all the way out to sleep. In many ways I am reminded of sound artist Brannan Lane, who released a couple dozen albums in the early 2000s, particularly his Sleep Cycle, Hypnotic Drift, Deep Unknown, and many other titles, that elicit similar listener responses using a variety on sound sources. Sleep is beautiful and the path to get there quickly starts right here with Brother Saturn’s dreamy sonic inventions.


Filed under: New releases, 2019 releases

Related artist(s): Brother Saturn / Drew Miller

More info
http://weareallghosts.bandcamp.com/album/music-for-sleep-waag-rel130

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