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Albert Marcoeur — L Apostrophe
(Label Frères M9, 2005, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2007-03-01

L Apostrophe Cover artWith numerous albums out going back to the early 70s, Albert Marcoeur can always be counted on for something unusual, though he’s never predictable. On this, his ninth album in about 32 years, the material presented is a collection of eccentric and experimental ideas run through a twisted blender that is a unique part of this artist’s vision. Elements of folk, pop, industrial, chamber, electronic and quirky art rock swirl around in a bizarre cauldron to never quite blend together, but herein lies the magic of his unique and brilliant “sound.” Add to that the vocals: mostly whispered, spoken, barely sung, with obvious elements of humor strewn within the French lyrical content; it’s both what gives these songs their charm and also what makes them impenetrable to those who are not fluent in the language. If the lyrics were sung in the typical sense, they could enhance and support the instrumental content, but because they are mostly spoken, they often tend to stand in front of it like an obstacle, demanding more attention. That said, there is still plenty here to hold the ear of the discriminating listener, and for those who understand what the lyrics to each of the 13 songs that begin with L’ mean (“L’Example Type,” “L’Intruse,” “L’Épitaphe”, etc.) consider it just an added bonus.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 34, 2005 releases

Related artist(s): Albert Marcoeur

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