Exposé Online banner

Vincent Priceless — Black Light Revival
(Baby Werewolf BW CD 0114, 2015, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2015-12-29

Black Light Revival Cover art

With a name like Vincent Priceless, you know not to expect something too serious. But what you actually should expect is a harder question. Black Light Revival could indicate a predilection towards psychedelic music, and that is a good part of the story with this release, though not the whole story. The opening track is “Psychedelic Sunshine Pop Crusader,” which, in addition to being a really catchy psych tune, reads almost as a manifesto. A close musical reference would be The Dukes of Stratosphear. Jangly guitars, Mellotron, tremolo vocals, wah-wah guitar – only the glaring lack of harpsichord and sitar prevents this song from checking all the boxes. But aside from those trappings, it’s a fun tune, name-dropping a bunch of psych classics and bemoaning the decline of rock in a hip-hop world. Luckily, the rest of the tracks provide some variety, not just repeating the same sounds. I’m often reminded of Johnny Unicorn’s music – the sense of humor is similar, as is the attention to detail in arrangement and production, not to mention a slight vocal resemblance. But Black Light Revival is not a joke album, rather a solid psych album that doesn’t take itself too seriously and has some humor in the lyrics. In this respect it’s very much in keeping with the spirit of the style, skewering certain aspects of modern life in the way the classic 60s bands took on the conformity, authority, and hypocrisy they saw around them. Priceless himself plays all the instruments except drums by Tom Curiano; one track features added guitar and drums from Art Quinn. This is an all-around great listen, and if it’s not quite up to the level of 25 O’Clock, well, what is?


Filed under: New releases, 2015 releases

Related artist(s): Vincent Priceless

Latest news

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more

2017-04-16
Allan Holdsworth RIP – Surely in the list of artists who have contributed to the sound of modern music, there is a special spot for guitarist Allan Holdsworth. His name is known to virtually every student of the instrument in jazz and rock, and his style has been so widely emulated that it's hardly worth mentioning anymore — we can just assume that every guitarist has Holdsworth as an influence. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Black Bonzo - Sound of the Apolcalypse – The Laser’s Edge is the label that introduced the world to Landberk and White Willow, and proprietor Ken Golden was instrumental in bringing Änglagård and Anekdoten to the attention of prog...  (2008) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues