Exposé Online banner

Tusmørke — Fjernsyn i Farver
(Karisma KAR142, 2018, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2018-07-14

Fjernsyn i Farver Cover art

This Oslo band has been pumping out the music lately, this being their third release in the last year or so. And (barring the diversion into children’s music with Bydyra) with Fjernsyn i Farver they continue to maintain a high standard of progressive rock originality, fording their own spin on classic sounds. All of the usual factors are present — classic keyboards, songs featuring multiple sections of differing style, and so on — along with a sense of humor. Although my lack of understanding of the Norwegian lyrics may cause me to think some parts (such as the vocal breaks in “Kniven i Kurven”) sound humorous when they’re intended as serious. And maybe my attitude is influenced by all the pictures I’ve seen of them wearing costumes. In any case, while the music is complex enough to invite theory-geek analysis, it’s also fun, almost as if it’s all done with a wink acknowledging the occasional silliness. The message is that progressive rock can be fun without resorting to parody. The keys, guitars, bass, and drums are supplemented by some nice flute playing, which emphasizes the general light touch to the proceedings. The level of craft and sophistication seems to have notched up a bit since the previous non-kids’ album, Hinsides, and every track features numerous nice touches, like the the sweeping synthesizer sounds that start “3001,” which might seem more at home in an Ozric Tentacles space jam, the grooving percussion on “Death Czar,” which contrasts with the grim lyrics (in English), and the flute / bass / clavinet trio that starts “Tøyens Hemmelighet,” which has a slight flavor of Jethro Tull. Fjernsyn i Farver continues the Tusmørke trend of getting better and better, managing to be musically engaging and immensely entertaining at the same time.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Alwanzatar (Kristoffer Momrak), Tusmørke

More info
http://tusm-rke.bandcamp.com/album/fjernsyn-i-farver

Latest news

2020-07-22
Tim Smith RIP – Tim Smith, leader of the eccentric band Cardiacs, has died at the ago of 59 after many years of health problems. Cardiacs was known for intense and complicated music that combined punk energy with the rhythmic and harmonic sophistication of progressive rock. » Read more

2020-07-12
Judy Dyble RIP – Singer-songwriter Judy Dyble, who was a founding member of Fairport Convention and one of the distinctive voices of the 60s folk revival in Britain, has died at the age of 71. Her passing came at the end of a long illness, though which she continued to work. » Read more

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Niagara - S.U.B. – Niagara were an early 70s German jazz rock outfit that released three albums of heavily percussion-oriented music. In fact, on this, their second album there are often four percussionists playing at...  (1995) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues