Exposé Online banner

Trem do Futuro — Trem do Futuro
(Progressive Rock Worldwide PRW 021, 1995, CD)

by Mike Ohman, 1997-02-01:

Trem do Futuro Cover art

If I'd had the chance to hear it last year, this would have been among my top 10 of '95. The six men that make up Trem do Futuro have a wonderous gift for melody and arrangement that any Italian band of the 70s would be proud of. They do have a touch of Latin flair to give them distinction, and singer Paulo Rossglow is one of the nicer (if not especially impressive) vocalists to come around in a while. The angelic flute playing, coupled with the tendency for the keyboardist to use electric piano-like sounds, give this album a slight retro feel. An excellent debut.


by Peter Thelen, 1996-03-01:

Trem do Futuro ("Future Train") is a young six-piece from Brazil that shows a lot of promise on this, their debut album. A standard four-piece of guitar / keyboards / bass / drums is rounded out with a dedicated lead vocalist and a flautist. Their style is rooted in classic progressive, with a touch of neo (can it be avoided?) and a big helping of folk influences woven right into the fabric of their music – much like the late, great 14Bis. The sound relies heavily on symphonics and grand visions for dynamics, with the folk underpinnings providing the color, and a fat bottom end that sometimes tends to get lost in the mix. Their sense of composition and arrangement is quite impressive; most of the tunes, while not overly long, are nonetheless quite involved and move through many ideas. Vocalist Paulo Rossglow sings the Portuguese lyrics with emotional savvy and power, though his voice always seems a bit too low in the mix. In fact, the underpowered and sloppy sound engineering is my only real gripe about this album – the opening track could be an example of how to do everything wrong at the mixing board. Still, this is a very solid debut from a band with a bright future, and certainly one to watch for in the future.


Filed under: New releases , Issue 9 , 1995 releases

Related artist(s): Trem do Futuro

More info

Latest news

2017-11-16
Celebrate 10 Years of Fruits de Mer – As a special celebration for a decade of cool vinyl releases, our friends at Fruits de Mer records have prepared a limited edition reissue of an album by the first band ever to appear on the label: Schizo Fun Addict. The band is known for unusual release strag » Read more

2017-11-02
Mega Dodo Presents New Charity Album – Our friends at Mega Dodo have put together a lovely compilation of their artists performing new arrangements of nursery rhymes, and all the profits from sales of the album will benefit Save the Children. It features a number of artists we've covered. » Read more

2017-10-18
Phil Miller RIP – Sad word reaches us today of the passing of another of the great musicians of the Canterbury Scene — guitarist Phil Miller. His distinctive sound added greatly to Matching Mole, Hatfield and the North, and National Health, and he also contributed to albums by Caravan, Dave Stewart & Barbara Gaskin, and many others. He was 68. » Read more

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Rumblin Orchestra - Spartacus – Spartacus by Rumblin' Orchestra is led by Hungarian keyboardist and composer Ella Bela. This release is technically fine, but is somewhat a rehash of things that have been done better before. Bela is...  (1999) » Read more

Deathwatch Beetle Repairman - Hollow Fishes – Debut albums from obtuse solo acts can be difficult to ascertain on the surface. The first few listens of this disc from the Toronto based artist sound very much like an alternative to some of the...  (1999) » Read more

Landberk - Dream Dance – Landberk's second CD-EP breaks no new territory, nor develops on their practically patented style, yet again delivers the goods. While I find that their music isn't as translatable live (both...  (1996) » Read more

Paul Ellis - The Infinity Room – Isn’t time a subject that has fascinated and haunted mankind from the beginning? Ellis pushes through the barriers and finds endless space in a yet confined room. Isn’t this the perfect...  (2007) » Read more

Various Artists - Higher and Higher: A Tribute to the Moody Blues – Given their influence on the genre, the Moody Blues are a great subject for progressive bands to cover and I’m surprised something like this hasn’t already been tried. But leave it to...  (2007) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues