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Reviews

The Insect Trust — The Insect Trust
(Ascension ANCD031, 1968/2000, CD)

by Mac Beaulieu, Published 2001-03-01

The Insect Trust Cover art

As a longtime fan of Fairport Convention and British folk rock, I had dismissed American folk as being either too cloying or too familiar. Not so with The Insect Trust, who do for American folk and blues what Fairport did to the British equivalent. For reference sake, I'd compare this with Unhalfbricking, and I'd have to say that this is probably at least as good, given its year and timeless nature. The Insect Trust takes original and traditional tunes and adapts them to their own hippie vision with plenty of saxes, recorders, clarinet, piccolo, banjo, strings, and jangly slide guitars, resulting in folk music that is vital and inviting. Vocalist Nancy Jefferies has an outstanding voice, landing somewhere between Sandy Denny and Jacqui McShee (Pentangle). I couldn't help but fall in love with this even during the first track, a lazy, sultry, country blues number, split in the middle by a nicely noisy jam. "Miss Fun City" sounds like it's right out of CCR's bayou with its strongly reverbed rhythm guitar, banjo, and creeping movement. As one might expect from the date, there is a war protest song, but this one from WWI. "Special Rider Blues," at 7:43, starts out simply enough, eventually growing into a simple extended jam that sends me into a long-lost bluesy rapture; indeed, it has been many years since the blues have sent me anywhere but running for cover. "Been Here and Gone So Soon" smacks of a folk classic in composition, melody, and arrangement. Though a couple of songs get fairly simple, it never gets too dull or banal. In fact, this whole effort reeks of musicians who were confident in their direction (even if in the end they didn't get there) and comes highly recommended to prog fans with folk/blues interests.


Filed under: Reissues, Issue 21, 2000 releases, 1968 recordings

Related artist(s): The Insect Trust

 

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