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Tajack — Tajack
(Musicando MUS 010, 1996, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 1997-02-01

Tajack Cover art

Imagine heavy-duty three-piece power funk with an Italian version of David Clayton Thomas (Blood Sweat & Tears) at the microphone, all placed in a progressive-hard-rock context. Add some police sirens and you have "L.A.," the opening track of this eponymous release by Tajack. A four piece of rippin' guitar, rumbling power bass, busy drums, and dedicated vocalist Fernando Marsili, the keyword here is high energy, beginning to end. The music herein has a definite early 70s hard-rock feel — not metal, but a fat and funky sound; Colliseum, maybe, or Blood Sweat and Tears on steroids, but without their respective brass sections. Their drive is passionate and unrelenting, you'll need a cigarette after listening to this. Guitarist Pat Franceschini burns the fretboard with his free-wheeling attack, while bassist Albert Tankou and drummer Guido Minguzzi push the pedal through the floor. These guys have a sense of humor too: "Rrasta Man" is a bizarre mix of Caribbean textures with a spirited and humorous vocal performance to match; the only place where they slow it down a bit is on "Raggiungimi," going for a slower and heavier sound. Their homage to Hendrix is "L'Ombra del Gigante," beginning with riffs from "Voodoo Child" and ending with an unusual version of "Purple Haze." The final two tracks are live cuts, confirming what the previous nine have led the listener to suspect: this band is as amazing live as they are in the studio.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 11, 1996 releases

Related artist(s): Tajack

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