Exposé Online banner

Stips — Egotrip
(Dureco 11-62362, 1996, CD)

by Jeff Melton, Published 1998-07-01

Egotrip Cover art

Originally I thought this album was a throwaway, but a shrewd scheme unfolds after a few passes through the disc. You see, it's interesting how far people stray (or evolve) from seventies roots into a band that survives, and remains current. What kind of sacrifices and changes are undertaken without losing musical integrity? R.J. Stips is a former member of Supersister, who along with brothers, Roy and Martin Bakker make up the self-named trio. Songwriting style for all the tracks varies from the earliest period (1970) to the present (from prog to Euro-pop) . So there is some seventies tint to a few pieces, but with after-the-fact variances. For example, "Memories Are New 1" incorporates a sound collage sampling from the Beatles' "Revolution #9." But "Memories Are New 3," composed fifteen years later is no more than a moody ballad. The common thread through the development of the album is commercial renderings of older pieces. "Dance Your Dance" has a great violin part which suffices as one of the more interesting songs. "Think It Over" is similar to Joe Jackson but less pumped up. The keyboard work is good, but the songs are not very intricate for someone who has been in the scene for a while: "A Girl Named You" at least has a spirited intro. I don’t know what the egotrip has been for RJ, but it certainly isn’t bitter or tainted for twenty five years of mostly minor obscurity. The album’s closer, "Pop25," states his position clearly "Don't make me choose between pop and classics, pop25 but no gymnastics." By not taking a stand, Egotrip winds up in music limbo where former supporters who are probably wondering why they even bothered.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 15, 1996 releases

Related artist(s): R.J. Stips

Latest news

2018-09-05
Krautrock Documentary Seeks Funding – The next installment of the Progressive Warriors documentary series will focus on the vast body of music that falls under the banner of "krautrock." As most of our readers will know, previous films have tackled RIO and the Canterbury scene, as well as what we might call "mainstream" prog rock. » Read more

2018-07-31
Tomasz Stańko RIP – Tomasz Stańko, one of the greats of Eastern European jazz, has died at the age of 76. Stańko's career started in Krzysztof Komeda's quintet, where he contributed trumpet from 1963-1967, when he formed his own group. He worked extensively with Edward Vesala, Don Cherry, Zbigniew Seifert, Chico Freeman, Howard Johnson, Cecil Taylor, and many others. Many of his recordings have been released by ECM, an association that began in the mid-70s. » Read more

2018-07-09
Soft Machine Set to Release New Music – It's been 50 years since The Soft Machine changed the face of music with their first album. Their blend of psychedelic rock and jazz was unique, and while the band went through many changes before disbanding in 1981 — by which time there were no original members remaining — they remained an innovative force with a style all their own. » Read more

2018-07-01
7d Surfaces Happy Rhodes Back Catalog – We've covered singer Happy Rhodes before, both for her solo work and recently with The Security Project, but her 11 albums have been hard to track down. Until now. 7d features high-quality downloads of all her releases, and several of them are also available on CD. » Read more

2018-06-25
Fred Chalenor RIP – We have news of another sad passing in the world of creative music. Bassist Fred Chalenor, whose creativity featured on albums by Tone Dogs, Caveman Shoestore, and many more, died on June 23, 2018 after a long battle with Alzheimer's. Tributes have poured in from the many musicians and fans whose lives he touched. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

(Tom Newman) - Variations on a Rhythm of Mike Oldfield - David Bedford – This is a four track EP, and is basically a Tom Newman album. It's confusing, I know. This is some of that stuff you know Oldfield and Co. did for laughs (when perhaps beer and worse entered the...  (1998) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues