Exposé Online banner

Steve Roach — Electron Birth
(Timeroom Editions , 2018, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2018-09-21

Electron Birth Cover art

In most circumstances, a CD with only two tracks would be considered a ‘single,’ but when the total time of the two tracks approaches the 70-minute mark, and consists of two essentially expanded electronic meditations, we are suddenly suspended in the timeroom of Steve Roach, a completely different world where interwoven threads of sonic energy flow inward to a point and outward in all directions at once. The 55-minute title track that opens the set is a multi-layered sequenced piece in the classic Berlin EM style that seems to be in a constant state of evolution, the slower atmosperic drifts coming to the surface occasionally while the more busy kaleidoscopic sequences dodge and evolve, raining colorful melodic fragments in all directions while dominating the proceedings of the piece, never far from the surface. Surprisingly, or perhaps not, the title track was recorded live in the studio-like environment of the Galactic Center in Tucson, Arizona on February 11, 2018 in front of a live audience. I say surprisingly because as multi-layered and dense as the piece is, one would suspect this could only be something created in the confines of a studio, meticulously building the layers up and out and mixing them in the process; but Roach has a lot of experience creating live experiences like this, and many of them have been made available in recordings. As his other recent primarily sequenced releases like Molecules of Motion and Skeleton Keys clearly exhibit, this is a new level of complexity and depth for the pioneering classic German electronic music sound. The closing track, “Cloud Currents,” a studio creation in its entirety, is much shorter in length, barely over twelve minutes, but no less powerful, offering a beautiful crystalline landscape of floating ambience, with ever-shifting colors and atmosperes in slow moving waves that caress the soul like a blanket of warmth on a cold winter night under the stars.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Steve Roach

More info
http://steveroach.bandcamp.com/album/electron-birth

Latest news

2021-04-01
New Aristocrats Live Album on the Way – No foolin'! These supreme musicians toured Europe early in 2020, just before touring ceased to be a thing musicians could do, and there were some hot performances captured. On May 7, some of these will be releases as Freeze! Live in Europe 2020. » Read more

2021-03-25
Return of Jerry Lucky's Progressive Rock Files – After much consideration and surprisingly, positive feedback, Jerry Lucky is announcing the launch of the progressive Rock Files podcast, featuring the latest progressive rock music from around the world. » Read more

2021-03-14
Jewlia Eisenberg RIP – The sad news has come out that Jewlia Eisenberg has died. As a founding member of Charming Hostess, Eisenberg changed the face of music, bringing together Balkan klezmer, American folk, and experimental rock in a distinctive blend that garnered much praise. » Read more

2021-03-11
RIP Roger Trigaux – The sad news has come to our attention that Roger Trigaux, the guiding force of Present and former member of Univers Zero, passed away on the evening of March 10, 2021 after a long ilness. » Read more

2021-02-14
SoundQuest Fest 2021 – SoundQuest Fest, first experienced as a live festival in Tucson Arizona in 2010 was created by ambient music pioneer Steve Roach. This 2021 event will unite a worldwide gathering of artists and audience members together for a 3-day online event unique in the realm of ambient music. From March 26-28th a continuous flow of streamed performances, audio-video wonder worlds and deep immersion zones will burn bright on Roach’s YouTube channel. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Il Berlione - In 453 Minutes Infernal Cooking – One of the things I dislike about the CD revolution is the fact that many artists feel obliged to fill out at least 65 minutes of music on it, when it's obvious they don't have that many...  (1995) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues