Exposé Online banner

Snack Family — Bunny
(Slowfoot SLOLP037, 2018, LP / DL)

by Jon Davis, Published 2019-06-25

Bunny Cover art

Listening to Snack Family’s debut full-length, I was immediately reminded of the band Morphine. Snack Family features a lineup of guitar, sax, and drums, with both the guitar and the sax being the baritone variety, giving the music a very bass-heavy feeling, though sax man James Allsopp does contribute some alto sax and synthesizer to broaden the sound. The Morphine comparison gets stretched pretty thin with some of the tracks on the album, especially when guest singer Seaming To comes in on backing vocals, and at times it could be something like early Talking Heads with Nick Cave singing and a guest sax player. Guitarist Andrew Plummer uses his baritone in a variety of ways, sometimes handling the bass parts, sometimes chords or melodic lines, and he has a low-pitched, gruff voice that adds a measure of grit to the music. Tom Greenhalgh’s drumming is generally in a deliberate, basic style that locks in with the bass lines, though he does show subtlety when called for. Busy, tricky patterns are not his thing. Bunny is heavy, but not metal, and the riffs are both catchy and a little twisted, with unexpected notes and accents that keep the listener interested. “Love My Dog” is a particularly interesting case, with an insistent, dissonant guitar part, really unusual drum part, and a bass line on baritone guitar and sax that comes in for the second verse, hitting mostly offbeats. Then a weird synth part comes in with a part that expands on the bass line. The overall vibe of the tune is along the lines of Gang of Four (hints of “I Love a Man in Uniform”). If you’re looking for a new sound in arty post-punk rock, Snack Family is a great option.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Snack Family, Seaming To, Andrew Plummer / World Sanguine Report

More info
http://snackfamily.bandcamp.com/album/bunny

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Echolyn - As the World – Echolyn seems to be intent on making a career walking the line between commercially acceptable album-oriented rock and something a bit more challenging. First off, As the World is much more vocally...  (1995) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues