Exposé Online banner

Shylock — Gialorgues
(Musea FGBG 4105.AR, 1977/1994, CD)

by Dan Casey, 1994-05-01:

Gialorgues Cover art Most prog bands that came out of France in the 70s had something stylistically in common: a minimalist approach. Not minimalist in the sense of Philip Glass, say, but rather a profound thematic understatement which gave them a confident, but not arrogant, air. Gialorgues, the first of two albums from this three-piece, lives up to that generalization. The music is almost textbook symphonic. All the elements are here: soaring guitar leads, lyrical melodies (while always instrumental), rich chord voicings, and the quasi-classical musings of the adventurous ensemble. The album proper is comprised of two lengthy pieces with a short, march-like interlude between them. The second of the longer works is much more experimental than the first, with its improv percussion and guitar effects over a simple ostinato keyboard line. Interesting, recalls King Crimson, but drags on for far too long. The remaining five cuts on the disc are bonus tracks from 1981, when the band had dwindled to a duo after the drummer left. These keyboard/guitar duets are mildly amusing, but of lesser substance than the album itself. Musea (as usual) have provided excellent liner notes. Shylock are probably as popular as they've ever been, with Änglagård constantly citing them as major influences, and until their classic second album Île de Fièvre is released on disc, this offering will certainly suffice.

by Henry Schneider, 1996-12-31:

Gialorgues is one of those classic prog albums from the 70s that sky rocketed in value in collector circles. In the typical Musea tradition this CD reissue includes all the tracks from the original album plus five additional tracks performed by Frederic l’Épée and Didier Lustig in 1981. The excellent original tracks from Gialorgues are symphonic and consist of classical themes and lyrical electronic guitar solos. Shylock was very fond of the music by their progressive contemporaries Yes, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, Henry Cow, Van der Graaf Generator, and Robert Wyatt. It is very easy to hear the King Crimson influence, especially on the 19 minute "Le Cinquième." The five bonus tracks have a totally different feel to them. They are short, light, and airy similar in nature to Camel’s Snow Goose.

Filed under: Reissues , 1994 releases, 1977 releases

Related artist(s): Shylock

More info

Latest news

2017-11-16
Celebrate 10 Years of Fruits de Mer – As a special celebration for a decade of cool vinyl releases, our friends at Fruits de Mer records have prepared a limited edition reissue of an album by the first band ever to appear on the label: Schizo Fun Addict. The band is known for unusual release strag » Read more

2017-11-02
Mega Dodo Presents New Charity Album – Our friends at Mega Dodo have put together a lovely compilation of their artists performing new arrangements of nursery rhymes, and all the profits from sales of the album will benefit Save the Children. It features a number of artists we've covered. » Read more

2017-10-18
Phil Miller RIP – Sad word reaches us today of the passing of another of the great musicians of the Canterbury Scene — guitarist Phil Miller. His distinctive sound added greatly to Matching Mole, Hatfield and the North, and National Health, and he also contributed to albums by Caravan, Dave Stewart & Barbara Gaskin, and many others. He was 68. » Read more

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Happy the Man - Live – Although this live set would have been much more meaningful had it been released closer to when it was recorded in 1978, it stands today as evidence that this DC area quintet was as tight on-stage as...  (1994) » Read more

Threshold - Clone – Given that this is a Karl Groom project, and that it's on the GEP label, and that the first tune is called "Freaks," you would be pretty safe to assume this is another tired and unwanted neo-prog...  (1999) » Read more

Pendragon - The Masquerade Overture – Unlike Marillion, Pendragon have had to slog it out arduously throughout their career in order to achieve their level of success. The latest offering is an ambitious project to say the least. And if...  (1996) » Read more

John Wetton - Battle Lines – Comes a time when folks have to decide if they want to keep following an artist after they stop making music in a particular style – in this case progressive rock. Wetton and many like him...  (1995) » Read more

Il Berlione - In 453 Minutes Infernal Cooking – There is little I can add to the other reviews regarding Il Berlione's follow-up album, In 453 Minutes Infernal Cooking. Il Berlione"s second comes across as more jazzy and zany to my ears....  (1996) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues